Author Topic: Kyrie - etymology  (Read 908 times)

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Kyrie - etymology
« on: March 07, 2019, 08:21:28 AM »

Online Androslav

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Kyrie finishes an impossible layup - "Oh, Lord!"
Kyrie speaks to the media - "Uh-oh, Lord"
Kyrie misses a game - "Again? Oh, Lord!"

"Wikipedia":
Kyrie, a transliteration of Greek Κύριε, vocative case of Κύριος (Kyrios), is a common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called the Kyrie eleison (/ˈkɪərieɪ ɪˈleɪɪsɒn, -sən/; Ancient Greek: Κύριε, ἐλέησον, translit. Kýrie eléēson, lit. Lord, have mercy').[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyrie

So, since his name literally means "Oh, Lord",
We shouldn't be surprised at anything he does, amazing good or amazingly dumb.
Let's just "Oh Lord!" him and enjoy this rollercoaster ride while it lasts.
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2019, 10:39:57 AM »

Offline gift

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nicely done

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2019, 07:05:27 AM »

Online Androslav

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nicely done
Tnx man, I thought it was an interesting detail.
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2019, 09:38:42 AM »

Online ederson

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.

In the common use it means mister

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2019, 09:49:13 AM »

Offline Jiri Welsch

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.

In the common use it means mister

In Biblical Greek it’s very common!

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2019, 11:12:58 AM »

Offline President Red

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.

In the common use it means mister

I'm no linguist, but I believe that it actually means "Mr. Mister."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=belrNpqqA2g

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2019, 12:36:27 AM »

Offline tenn_smoothie

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.


And still used in prayer to this day ....... by Celtic fans hoping for the best and fearing the worst.
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Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2019, 05:31:11 AM »

Online Androslav

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.


And still used in prayer to this day ....... by Celtic fans hoping for the best and fearing the worst.
Tnx @ederson - I expected your insight on this matter :)
@tenn_smoothie - It sure is. Just wait till the playoffs start!
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2019, 05:32:59 AM »

Online Androslav

  • Jim Loscutoff
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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.

In the common use it means mister

I'm no linguist, but I believe that it actually means "Mr. Mister."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=belrNpqqA2g
Kyrie Eleison, which means "Lord, have mercy" - That's the only thing in the description.
I believe it is Lord before Mister.
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2019, 09:19:21 AM »

Offline DefenseWinsChamps

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Small addition/correction

The word Kyrios is very rarely used in this way and almost exclusively in prayers.

In the common use it means mister

In Biblical Greek it’s very common!

It's really not as soft as "Mister" either. It does ascribe authority and honor to someone, but since our culture is largely devoid of this kind of honoring, it's difficult to translate. In honor/shame cultures it would be a much more common concept used of fathers, mothers, husbands, bosses, political leaders, elders, etc.

The closest we have is the way we refer to judges, "Your honor." Another way to think of it is the way the title "Doctor" gives honor to someone, but this word doesn't have any idea of education with it. It's similar to the old English way of saying, "My Lord."

You could also say, "master," the way the Ninja turtles referred to Splinter (without the concept of slavery).

There is also an interesting etymological connection between the Greek word "kurios" and the Hebrew word "Yahweh," which is one of the reasons Jesus is called Lord often in the Bible.
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Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2019, 05:03:23 PM »

Online ederson

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I unaware of the honor part in the word Kyrie. The initial meaning was The main the most important. Later it became Lord as God in religious texts and lord/master in daily life. And it was used exactly the same way as master in slavery.

Today though we use  the word Kyrios  as Mr

Re: Kyrie - etymology
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2019, 05:27:23 PM »

Online Androslav

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I unaware of the honor part in the word Kyrie. The initial meaning was The main the most important. Later it became Lord as God in religious texts and lord/master in daily life. And it was used exactly the same way as master in slavery.

Today though we use  the word Kyrios  as Mr
Thanks. Then it is "Lord" Irving.
Goes along the "Sir" Charles lines, as a nickname, but has more factography related to its meaning.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 05:33:46 PM by Androslav »
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

 

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