Author Topic: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars  (Read 13912 times)

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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2022, 12:36:45 PM »

Offline boscel33

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Saw a joke saying "Will's marriage is open to everything, except jokes."

 ;D

This one's good too:

Whatís that on Chris Rockís face?

Fresh Prints!
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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #46 on: March 28, 2022, 12:40:44 PM »

Offline Roy H.

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".


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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #47 on: March 28, 2022, 12:42:00 PM »

Online angryguy77

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Saw a joke saying "Will's marriage is open to everything, except jokes."

 ;D

This one's good too:

Whatís that on Chris Rockís face?

Fresh Prints!

haha!
Fire Joe.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #48 on: March 28, 2022, 12:59:32 PM »

Online liam

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I hope Chris Rock apologizes and we can all move on...


 ::)

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #49 on: March 28, 2022, 01:00:26 PM »

Offline nickagneta

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #50 on: March 28, 2022, 01:05:09 PM »

Offline dannyboy35

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 Very interesting topic. Iím guessing Smith regrets the slap but he knows he can never win a war of words with Chris Rock. If somebody argues or speaks exceptionally well or just better than do right else, they can be in the wrong and come out looking great after insulting you. A lot of grown men do this now because they know they wonít have to deal with physical repercussions.
  So they can be cruel and collect the W with a big grin on their face. They can also keep it coming.
   Itís not fair to sit and take it. Sometimes life isnít fair. But Smith is rich so he wonít have to deal with serious ( or any) legal repercussions . A regular person would be unemployed snd find it hard to get a good job ever again.
   Yet many women are backing Will Smith for this defense of his family. Many of the same people are very against violence. Very interesting. I can see both sides of this.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #51 on: March 28, 2022, 01:05:40 PM »

Online angryguy77

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

If she were my wife, I'd tell her to get one of her BF's over and defend her honor.
He should've cut ties a long time ago, so my sympathy only goes so far for him. However, she's humiliated him far greater than what said last night.
Fire Joe.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #52 on: March 28, 2022, 01:06:07 PM »

Offline johnnygreen

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If Jada is that ultra-sensitive about her hair loss, then why wasnít she wearing a wig? When I first saw her last night, I thought it was a fashion choice. After what happened, I googled if she was sick, and realized she has alopecia. By not wearing a wig, I would have thought that she accepted and was comfortable with her appearance. I like Will Smith, but that was a total bush league move he pulled last night. I think his crying during his speech, was him realizing he may have just ruined his career. Or at the very least, will never be nominated for an Oscar again.

I came away totally impressed with Chris Rock, and him being a true professional. Being a standup comedian is not easy. The Oscars have to release a statement that Will Smith will no longer be allowed to attend or be nominated in the future. What future host/comedian will want to be a part of this show in the future, if there are no consequences to one of the actors attacking them on stage?

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #53 on: March 28, 2022, 01:06:10 PM »

Offline SHAQATTACK

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Wills very first reaction he seemed to smile and chuckle a second , but when he saw his wifeís face , his whole demeanor changed in an instant .  Could kinda read his second reaction Ö. To oh I gotta do something Ö.panick reaction to his wifeís look or disgust.

IMO Öit was a a half hearted , I ve got to do something right now .   

Professional comedian as himself , Will could have grabbed the mic and ripped Rocks behind with a comeback or two ÖÖwhich would have righted a wrong and left everybody laughing .   Poor choice of action given his acting and natural instincts for comedy.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #54 on: March 28, 2022, 01:06:59 PM »

Offline dannyboy35

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

   Great post ,in my opinion.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #55 on: March 28, 2022, 01:09:39 PM »

Offline BruceBanner18

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^^ What's not right is he SLAPPED another man. This is only allowed if it's immediately followed by a challenge to a dual. Or if you're a fashion designer.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #56 on: March 28, 2022, 01:17:30 PM »

Offline bdm860

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Out of all the ways it could have gone down, that slap was probably pretty mild.

Like what if Will punched him, knocking Rock to the ground and/or giving Rock a bloody nose or lip?

Or what if Will grabbed him, and ends up wrestling him to the ground.

Or if Will got up in his face and started arguing with Rock into a hot mic.

Anything where security actually needs to get up there and break it up.

Slap and walk away seems kind of mild when you think of other ways that could have ended.

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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #57 on: March 28, 2022, 01:18:33 PM »

Online PAOBoston

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Comedian gets hired to host and crack jokes at actors receiving awards. Comedian makes joke. Actor gets upset and punches comedian.

I dont think I have ever watched a second of an award show but watching this reaffirms the fact that actors in Hollywood are insufferable. Itís a show. Itís the hosts job to make jokes. Why didnít Smith go around and slap all the other actors who were laughing at the joke too if he was so offended. If the comedian was a woman, does Smith go up to the stage and slap her in public too? Gross (scripted?) overreaction by Smith. The best part was he himself even laughed at the joke. Thatís the best part of this entire thing.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #58 on: March 28, 2022, 01:27:03 PM »

Offline BruceBanner18

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Will Smith is the Kevin Durant of Hollywood

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2022, 02:11:12 PM »

Offline bdm860

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Eh, you've told stories about your ex-wife who is Puerto Rican (I think) and somebody (maybe at a furniture store?) not knowing she was made a negative comment about Puerto Ricans in front of both of you.  I'm pretty sure that didn't end with you slapping the guy.

Now you might have definitely thought about it, but there's a big difference between thinking and doing it.

I have a hard time imagining any scenario where I'm hitting a guy even over the most offensive of comments to my wife whom I deeply love.  And I think most men are NOT doing that, no matter how much they love their wife.

But I'm also the guy who just thought Mr. Clean wouldn't be offensive (though definitely not appropriate for a 10 year old), or didn't think calling Patty Mills a Jamaican bobsledder was offensive.  What do I know.

After 18 months with their Bigs, the Littles were: 46% less likely to use illegal drugs, 27% less likely to use alcohol, 52% less likely to skip school, 37% less likely to skip a class