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Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2019, 11:17:51 AM »

Offline gpap

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From the MLB: Congratulations to the Boston Red Sox on their historic 2018 World Series Championship. So go out their Boston and defend your title!!! Yay!!!!

Oh, by the way you start off on an 11 games in 11days west coast trip. Good luck with that whole "getting off to a fast start" thing!

I'll admit, I've never seen or heard of a team having an 11 game road trip. 10 games has always been the max. That aside, it's probably better to get this trip out of the way now, especially where the weather is going to be warmer in Oakland and Arizona and Seattle has a retractable dome in the event of bad weather. The weather here in the Northeast is still pretty cold for baseball.

Hopefully the temperature will increase at least a tick for the home opener on April 9th.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2019, 11:19:15 AM »

Offline Phantom255x

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series. 
"Tough times never last, but tough people do." - Robert H. Schuller

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2019, 11:59:26 AM »

Offline footey

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Thought it time to start this year's thread. Lots to talk about to start this season:

- Mike Trout extends out 12 years at $430 million. So how much does that make Betts worth. He doesn't reach free agency for 2 years and made it clear he will not be giving Boston a discount. If he has two more awesome years will he become the league's first half billion dollar man?

- The bullpen stinks. They didn't sign a closer. Thornburg, Brasier and Barnes are not filling me with great confidence that the Sox don't need a real life proven closer.

- Chris Sale extends out 5 more years at $30 million per year. Good to see that happen and they didn't Jon Lester him. Now  Cora just has to use Sale properly so he is good in the 2nd half and playoffs every year for the next 6 years.

- Opening day next week. Let's go Red Sox.

Let me know when you start having second thoughts on Sale's new contract, Nick!!

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2019, 12:47:06 PM »

Online nickagneta

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Thought it time to start this year's thread. Lots to talk about to start this season:

- Mike Trout extends out 12 years at $430 million. So how much does that make Betts worth. He doesn't reach free agency for 2 years and made it clear he will not be giving Boston a discount. If he has two more awesome years will he become the league's first half billion dollar man?

- The bullpen stinks. They didn't sign a closer. Thornburg, Brasier and Barnes are not filling me with great confidence that the Sox don't need a real life proven closer.

- Chris Sale extends out 5 more years at $30 million per year. Good to see that happen and they didn't Jon Lester him. Now  Cora just has to use Sale properly so he is good in the 2nd half and playoffs every year for the next 6 years.

- Opening day next week. Let's go Red Sox.

Let me know when you start having second thoughts on Sale's new contract, Nick!!
I think I will give it a couple to three years before I make any comments about Sale not being worth his contract. Not gonna criticize a 5 year contract after game one.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2019, 12:47:09 PM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series.

What amazes me about the Yankees is that for years they didn't have a great farm system, relying heavily on buying free agents, now (seemingly) all of a sudden they have more good young players and big bats than the Sox.
"There are two kinds of people: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, 'All right, then, have it your way.'"

"You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."

ó C.S. Lewis

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2019, 01:47:55 PM »

Offline gpap

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Thought it time to start this year's thread. Lots to talk about to start this season:

- Mike Trout extends out 12 years at $430 million. So how much does that make Betts worth. He doesn't reach free agency for 2 years and made it clear he will not be giving Boston a discount. If he has two more awesome years will he become the league's first half billion dollar man?

- The bullpen stinks. They didn't sign a closer. Thornburg, Brasier and Barnes are not filling me with great confidence that the Sox don't need a real life proven closer.

- Chris Sale extends out 5 more years at $30 million per year. Good to see that happen and they didn't Jon Lester him. Now  Cora just has to use Sale properly so he is good in the 2nd half and playoffs every year for the next 6 years.

- Opening day next week. Let's go Red Sox.

Let me know when you start having second thoughts on Sale's new contract, Nick!!
I think I will give it a couple to three years before I make any comments about Sale not being worth his contract. Not gonna criticize a 5 year contract after game one.

I will admit though, I am a bit surprised the Sox gave Sale that extension, knowing his shoulder starts to fatigue as the season goes on and his velocity dips as a result. Even yesterday, the fastest he threw was 94 mph. I know the Sox wanted to avoid another Jon Lester situation, but I just hope they didn't jump the gun. I'd like to think the Sox medical staff was 100% sure that there's nothing physically wrong with Sale.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2019, 01:51:45 PM »

Offline gpap

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series.

What amazes me about the Yankees is that for years they didn't have a great farm system, relying heavily on buying free agents, now (seemingly) all of a sudden they have more good young players and big bats than the Sox.

Since George Steinbrenner passed on and his sons took control, the Yankees have changed their business model from heavy spenders to relying more on a beefed up farm system. They'll still make the occasional free agent splash as their payroll is over $200 million. However, they're alot more conservative than their father was at spending on free agents and trading prospects for veteran talent.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2019, 02:38:04 PM »

Online nickagneta

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Since George Steinbrenner passed on and his sons took control, the Yankees have changed their business model from heavy spenders to relying more on a beefed up farm system. They'll still make the occasional free agent splash as their payroll is over $200 million. However, they're alot more conservative than their father was at spending on free agents and trading prospects for veteran talent.
I am sure that George is rolling over in his grave knowing his sons got outspent by the Red Sox and that the 4-time-World-Series-champion-in-the-last-15-years Red Sox are the dominant franchise of the new millennium.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2019, 02:52:47 PM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series.

What amazes me about the Yankees is that for years they didn't have a great farm system, relying heavily on buying free agents, now (seemingly) all of a sudden they have more good young players and big bats than the Sox.

Since George Steinbrenner passed on and his sons took control, the Yankees have changed their business model from heavy spenders to relying more on a beefed up farm system. They'll still make the occasional free agent splash as their payroll is over $200 million. However, they're alot more conservative than their father was at spending on free agents and trading prospects for veteran talent.

Makes sense. But I guess it's also true that their front office (Cashman and Co.) is exceptional at evaluating talent.

Boston's got a great defensive outfield and some solid young players after Betts (Benny, Bogaerts, Devers, Bradley), and of course J.D., but it just seems to me that the Yankees have a more dangerous and explosive offensive group with Stanton, Judge, Andujar, Torres, Hicks, Voit, and Gregorius (and even Sanchez, who had a horrible average last season but still hit 18 homers, which is a heck of a lot more than Vazquez, Swihart, or Leon will likely hit).

Of course, I might just be bitter after such a crappy opening day. ;D
"There are two kinds of people: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, 'All right, then, have it your way.'"

"You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."

ó C.S. Lewis

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2019, 01:41:47 PM »

Offline gpap

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series.

What amazes me about the Yankees is that for years they didn't have a great farm system, relying heavily on buying free agents, now (seemingly) all of a sudden they have more good young players and big bats than the Sox.

Since George Steinbrenner passed on and his sons took control, the Yankees have changed their business model from heavy spenders to relying more on a beefed up farm system. They'll still make the occasional free agent splash as their payroll is over $200 million. However, they're alot more conservative than their father was at spending on free agents and trading prospects for veteran talent.

Makes sense. But I guess it's also true that their front office (Cashman and Co.) is exceptional at evaluating talent.

Boston's got a great defensive outfield and some solid young players after Betts (Benny, Bogaerts, Devers, Bradley), and of course J.D., but it just seems to me that the Yankees have a more dangerous and explosive offensive group with Stanton, Judge, Andujar, Torres, Hicks, Voit, and Gregorius (and even Sanchez, who had a horrible average last season but still hit 18 homers, which is a heck of a lot more than Vazquez, Swihart, or Leon will likely hit).

Of course, I might just be bitter after such a crappy opening day. ;D

See, I think the Sox have a better offensive lineup than the Yanks do. I also think the Sox starting rotation is better (despite some concerns like Sale's drop in velocity, Price's struggles pitching against the Yankees, etc.)

My main fear is the Sox bullpen. The Yanks certainly have the better bullpen with adding Britton and Ottavino. Let's hope it doesn't come down to the bullpens. Let's also hope the Sox win the division again because sneaking in with the wildcard leads to a more difficult road in the postseason (as we saw last season.)

Hope that comeback last night in Seattle with Moreland's 3 run dinger took some of the sting away from Opening Day.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2019, 02:40:45 PM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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Quote
I don't know why Dombrowski felt fine with not getting relief help this offseason.

Itís really bizarre to me.  They replaced Kelly and Kimbrel with nobody.

They chose not to bring back Kimbrel and/or sign other elite names to stay under the 246M luxury tax threshold. They already pay a luxury tax, but once you cross 246M, you pay a higher bracket % AND lose 10 spots in the Draft. They already took that penalty in 2018 and I think if you go over that threshold another year the $$$ goes up. So they paid 12M in luxury tax last year, and after this season (if they'd gone over 246M), they'll pay around 24M I think. Now though it's probably 20M since they didn't go over.

Right now their payroll is around 239M. There's about 7M that could go towards in-season trade acquisitions and such. But yeah, even outside the elite names (Kimbrel, Ottavino, Robertson, etc.), there were many good-great options to go after who went for cheap (Romo, Sipp, Wilson, etc.) yet they signed absolutely no one. That's perplexing. Most of those guys signed for less than 3M which we could have easily afforded even when trying to staying under 246M.

And as a result, Hembree and Thornburg are now 2 of our Top-4 relievers on the team!  ::) (ugh)

Yeah, that totally befuddles me as well. I get the ramifications of exceeding the luxury tax (draft pick sliding 10 spots down, heavy tax penalties) but the Sox are also defending the World Series and have a golden opportunity to be the first team in almost 20 years to repeat.

So what if they exceed the luxury tax? If you continue to field a competitive team that can contend for a World Series on a yearly basis, you not only make up the money from being taxed, you're still probably going to turn a huge profit.

Winning brings fans to the ball park. Losing keeps them away. Something John Henry has never been able to comprehend.

Personally, I think David Robertson and Adam Ottavino were two guys the Sox should've taken a serious look at. Both guys came off successful seasons and Robertson preferred to pitch in the East coast because he lives in Rhode Island.

So, the Sox decided to sacrifice the bullpen and I am worried about Chris Sale and his drop in velocity (and the fact the Sox just tied him to a 5 year, $145 million extension.)

Hopefully the rails don't come off the track early into the season. And can Dombrowski PLEASE dump the Tyler Thornburg experiment, cut his losses and admit that was an awful trade (dealing Travis Shaw and 3 prospects, what a fiasco.)

They already are over the luxury tax. The luxury tax kicks in once you go past 206M. Then there's like 2 tiers I believe. Once you cross the first tier (I think it's around 225M but correct me if I'm wrong), the penalties become a bit harsher, but once you cross that second (and harshest) threshold (at 246M), then those penalties hit. The Sox were trying to avoid that latter one for a second straight year.

The Yankees payroll is around 220M. In a way they passed up on Machado/Harper because signing either to some 300M+ deal adds another big contract but also puts their payroll past 246M. But you could argue that adding either would have made them CLEAR favorites to win the division and probably World Series.

What amazes me about the Yankees is that for years they didn't have a great farm system, relying heavily on buying free agents, now (seemingly) all of a sudden they have more good young players and big bats than the Sox.

Since George Steinbrenner passed on and his sons took control, the Yankees have changed their business model from heavy spenders to relying more on a beefed up farm system. They'll still make the occasional free agent splash as their payroll is over $200 million. However, they're alot more conservative than their father was at spending on free agents and trading prospects for veteran talent.

Makes sense. But I guess it's also true that their front office (Cashman and Co.) is exceptional at evaluating talent.

Boston's got a great defensive outfield and some solid young players after Betts (Benny, Bogaerts, Devers, Bradley), and of course J.D., but it just seems to me that the Yankees have a more dangerous and explosive offensive group with Stanton, Judge, Andujar, Torres, Hicks, Voit, and Gregorius (and even Sanchez, who had a horrible average last season but still hit 18 homers, which is a heck of a lot more than Vazquez, Swihart, or Leon will likely hit).

Of course, I might just be bitter after such a crappy opening day. ;D

See, I think the Sox have a better offensive lineup than the Yanks do. I also think the Sox starting rotation is better (despite some concerns like Sale's drop in velocity, Price's struggles pitching against the Yankees, etc.)

My main fear is the Sox bullpen. The Yanks certainly have the better bullpen with adding Britton and Ottavino. Let's hope it doesn't come down to the bullpens. Let's also hope the Sox win the division again because sneaking in with the wildcard leads to a more difficult road in the postseason (as we saw last season.)

Hope that comeback last night in Seattle with Moreland's 3 run dinger took some of the sting away from Opening Day.

You can certainly make the case that Boston's offense is better, and I won't argue. I think it's a situation in which either offense could be slightly better than the other on any given day. And I agree that the bullpen is potentially a big problem. But they hurled 4 scoreless last night, which was great to see.

And yes, last night's comeback indeed took away some of the sting of Opening Day.
"There are two kinds of people: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, 'All right, then, have it your way.'"

"You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."

ó C.S. Lewis

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2019, 08:12:47 PM »

Online ozgod

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So right now our starters have lasted 14.3 innings total across 4 games and gave up 22 earned runs. Help us David Price, you're our only (Edited for profanity.  Please do not do it again.ing) hope  :angel:
Any odd typos are because I suck at typing on an iPhone :D

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2019, 09:28:36 PM »

Offline jambr380

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So, not a great start to the season, but there is this:

https://sports.yahoo.com/report-red-sox-xander-bogaerts-005139002.html

6 yrs/$120M is quite the commitment to Bogaerts, but nice to see the Sox re-signing their own.

Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2019, 09:36:03 PM »

Offline gpap

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So, not a great start to the season, but there is this:

https://sports.yahoo.com/report-red-sox-xander-bogaerts-005139002.html

6 yrs/$120M is quite the commitment to Bogaerts, but nice to see the Sox re-signing their own.

Good news on Bogaerts.

But yeah, awful start to the season.

I would never have guessed the starting rotation would've been this bad.

Mariners laid 34 runs on the Sox in the series.

I guess the Sox starters didn't pitch many innings in spring training by design to keep them fresh through the course of the season, so right now it appears the Sox rotation is in exhibition mode. Not pretty.

Hopefully this series was just an aberration.


Re: 2019 Red Sox Thread
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2019, 10:55:41 PM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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So awesome to see that the Sox have adopted the Patriots' philosophy of "extended exhibition season." :( Hopefully it pays off in the end, but boy, it's a real pain in the butt right now.
"There are two kinds of people: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, 'All right, then, have it your way.'"

"You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."

ó C.S. Lewis