Author Topic: Election Night 2018  (Read 1671 times)

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Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #60 on: November 12, 2018, 11:52:02 AM »

Offline FatKidsDad

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Not shockingly, the state of Florida sounds like its usual disaster right now.

Yeah, Broward in particular. The head election official sounds incompetent - or crooked - as hell.
I'll go with incompetent and invoke Hanlon's razor:

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Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #61 on: November 12, 2018, 11:55:07 AM »

Offline jambr380

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Whatís really crazy in Broward is that 26,000 people who voted for governor reportedly didnít vote for Senate...which obviously doesnít make any sense. This recount really could Ďcountí.

On another note, Scott, Trump, and many other Republicans have gone off their rockers and are making baseless claims of fraud. All because they were still counting mail-in ballots (of which there are a LOT) in Broward and Palm Beach counties?

The sad part is (as I am a resident of FL), Scott has basically personally bought his Governor and Senate positions personally by spending tens of millions of his own money each election. All elections he has barely won...like really barely. If there were no tea party wave in 2010, we would have no idea who he even is.

And I donít even hate Scott - weíll, until his recent behavior - but FL should not have two R Senators when they are so middle of the road.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2018, 11:56:20 AM »

Online fairweatherfan

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Whatís really crazy in Broward is that 26,000 people who voted for governor reportedly didnít vote for Senate...which obviously doesnít make any sense. This recount really could Ďcountí.

In shades of 2000 (anyone remember the "butterfly ballot"?), the Senate voting issue in Broward appears to be due to an oddly designed ballot that put the Senate vote at the bottom of a column that was otherwise all instructions, leading to a massively higher rate of non-votes than in any other county in the state and probably costing Nelson thousands of net votes.

https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/political-pulse/os-ne-broward-ballot-florida-senate-20181108-story.html

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #63 on: November 12, 2018, 01:21:38 PM »

Online nickagneta

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Looks like out of the 10 remaining Congressional seats that are undecided 4 will go to Democrats meaning the Democrats will have picked up 34 seats.

Meanwhile out of the remaining three Senatorial races undecided it looks like Arizona is going Democrat. Mississippi is going to a runoff and the Republican candidate just said she would want a front row seat at a public hanging, in a state where more African Americans have been hung since the Reconstruction era and she is facing an African American candidate. And Florida is going to a recount because there were still tens of thousands of votes uncounted in heavily Democratic Broward and Palm Beach counties. If all three go Democrat that means the Republicans didn't pick up any Senate seats and still have 3 moderate Republicans that vote both ways.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #64 on: November 12, 2018, 01:26:47 PM »

Online slamtheking

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Looks like out of the 10 remaining Congressional seats that are undecided 4 will go to Democrats meaning the Democrats will have picked up 34 seats.

Meanwhile out of the remaining three Senatorial races undecided it looks like Arizona is going Democrat. Mississippi is going to a runoff and the Republican candidate just said she would want a front row seat at a public hanging, in a state where more African Americans have been hung since the Reconstruction era and she is facing an African American candidate. And Florida is going to a recount because there were still tens of thousands of votes uncounted in heavily Democratic Broward and Palm Beach counties. If all three go Democrat that means the Republicans didn't pick up any Senate seats and still have 3 moderate Republicans that vote both ways.
not to nitpick but, do they really?  seems like every Rep in congress votes with Trump almost always.  there may be a few that offer lip service to thinking/voting independent of Trump but in actuality, they vote with him.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #65 on: November 12, 2018, 02:36:31 PM »

Online nickagneta

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Looks like out of the 10 remaining Congressional seats that are undecided 4 will go to Democrats meaning the Democrats will have picked up 34 seats.

Meanwhile out of the remaining three Senatorial races undecided it looks like Arizona is going Democrat. Mississippi is going to a runoff and the Republican candidate just said she would want a front row seat at a public hanging, in a state where more African Americans have been hung since the Reconstruction era and she is facing an African American candidate. And Florida is going to a recount because there were still tens of thousands of votes uncounted in heavily Democratic Broward and Palm Beach counties. If all three go Democrat that means the Republicans didn't pick up any Senate seats and still have 3 moderate Republicans that vote both ways.
not to nitpick but, do they really?  seems like every Rep in congress votes with Trump almost always.  there may be a few that offer lip service to thinking/voting independent of Trump but in actuality, they vote with him.
On certain issues I think they definitely will. Approving conservative judges and tax cuts, no. But there are other issues where a couple to three Republican Senators will swing.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #66 on: November 16, 2018, 09:52:56 AM »

Online fairweatherfan

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Wow with the flip of one of Maine's House seats the only Republican left in Congress representing any part of New England is...Susan Collins.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #67 on: November 16, 2018, 10:03:56 AM »

Online Roy H.

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Wow with the flip of one of Maine's House seats the only Republican left in Congress representing any part of New England is...Susan Collins.

Yeah, Maine's second district is about the only Republican district left anywhere in New England, and we're still split pretty evenly.  The Democrats' giant money advantage and ranked choice voting flipped the seat.

Southern Maine and New Hampshire have essentially turned into offshoots of Massachusetts, bringing their politics with them.  It's basically a combination of suburban liberals and poor non-workers on public assistance.  Republicans still do well in the most rural parts of Maine and New Hampshire (as they do everywhere in rural areas), but they're not making up any ground elsewhere.

On the local level, it will be interesting to see how Maine does.  We don't have a large tax base as it is, and we're losing population.  We have several excellent colleges, but students tend to leave Maine.  With a Democrat governor and Democrats now controlling both houses of the legislature, there's an expected increase in social services.  I'm not sure how that will be sustainable without raising taxes on an already over-burdened working class.


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Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #68 on: November 28, 2018, 01:25:26 PM »

Online fairweatherfan

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So Cindy Hyde-Smith won the MS runoff last night, meaning Republicans flipped 4 Senate seats to the Democrats' 2 for a net gain of +2.  And Democrats have flipped 43 House seats to the Republicans' 3, for a net gain of +40.  National House popular vote is over +8 which makes it vote-wise the biggest midterm wave since 1986.

But this is a fascinating story that isn't getting national attention - North Carolina's election board is UNANIMOUSLY refusing to certify election results in one of their Congressional districts. Details are lacking but it seems to be related to what sounds like the NC equivalent of Broward County. The election was a slim R win on paper so it's a pretty big deal that all the Republicans are onboard with not certifying as well. Story here:

https://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/editorials/article222294350.html

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #69 on: November 28, 2018, 01:46:31 PM »

Offline heyvik

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So Cindy Hyde-Smith won the MS runoff last night, meaning Republicans flipped 4 Senate seats to the Democrats' 2 for a net gain of +2.  And Democrats have flipped 43 House seats to the Republicans' 3, for a net gain of +40.  National House popular vote is over +8 which makes it vote-wise the biggest midterm wave since 1986.

But this is a fascinating story that isn't getting national attention - North Carolina's election board is UNANIMOUSLY refusing to certify election results in one of their Congressional districts. Details are lacking but it seems to be related to what sounds like the NC equivalent of Broward County. The election was a slim R win on paper so it's a pretty big deal that all the Republicans are onboard with not certifying as well. Story here:

https://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/editorials/article222294350.html

Aren't you tired of so much winning?

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #70 on: November 28, 2018, 03:54:13 PM »

Offline Celtics4ever

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Half of Blue Wave I would suppose.  Still one would think they would have done better against President Trump, eh?

It is easy to be the party of opposition but now they will have to govern and share governance.   I think the GOP discovered that when they got power and had no replacement for Obamacare and it hurt them.    Up to now, the Dems have largely been the party of Anti-Trump with little policy.   They also won't be able to get much done because they do not control the Senate.   But they gained the power of the subpeona which can be good but I think turns off people after a while.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #71 on: November 28, 2018, 04:04:14 PM »

Offline Vermont Green

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The House can pass and put forth bills to the Senate and dare the Republicans there to not take action.  I expect the Dems in the House will pass legislation for immigration, health care, and infrastructure along with some budget balancing hopefully.  And I expect the Senate will not do anything.  Republicans could not obtain a consensus when they had the majority in both houses.  There are still too many ultra-radical rightwingers in the party.  Senate Republicans will not be able to forge a consensus on anything.

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #72 on: November 28, 2018, 06:53:05 PM »

Online Neurotic Guy

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Wow with the flip of one of Maine's House seats the only Republican left in Congress representing any part of New England is...Susan Collins.

Yeah, Maine's second district is about the only Republican district left anywhere in New England, and we're still split pretty evenly.  The Democrats' giant money advantage and ranked choice voting flipped the seat.

Southern Maine and New Hampshire have essentially turned into offshoots of Massachusetts, bringing their politics with them. It's basically a combination of suburban liberals and poor non-workers on public assistance.  Republicans still do well in the most rural parts of Maine and New Hampshire (as they do everywhere in rural areas), but they're not making up any ground elsewhere.

On the local level, it will be interesting to see how Maine does.  We don't have a large tax base as it is, and we're losing population.  We have several excellent colleges, but students tend to leave Maine.  With a Democrat governor and Democrats now controlling both houses of the legislature, there's an expected increase in social services.  I'm not sure how that will be sustainable without raising taxes on an already over-burdened working class.


How significant do you really think this "voting block" of poor non-workers on public assistance is in NH?  My guess is that this group does not make up much of what is turning NH blue.  First off, they're not new to NH (people don't typically move to NH for the welfare); secondly, NH unemployment rate is 2.1%; and lastly, people on the lowest rung of the eonomic ladder are not known historically for being high turnout voters. 

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #73 on: November 28, 2018, 07:21:00 PM »

Offline Rosco917

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Hard to believe this is still a topic anyone is will to talk about...after two years. Any improprieties would rise to the surface by now, yet they don't.

Americans were given the choice of two poor candidates. It was basically a competition of who was the most polarizing of the two. The Billionaire narcissist with funny hair, or the most unlikable lying, political insiders on earth.

As predicted...one of the two was the winner.

I'm looking forward to a Sanders-Cortez ticket.  :o 


   

Re: Election Night 2018
« Reply #74 on: November 28, 2018, 07:49:29 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Wow with the flip of one of Maine's House seats the only Republican left in Congress representing any part of New England is...Susan Collins.

Yeah, Maine's second district is about the only Republican district left anywhere in New England, and we're still split pretty evenly.  The Democrats' giant money advantage and ranked choice voting flipped the seat.

Southern Maine and New Hampshire have essentially turned into offshoots of Massachusetts, bringing their politics with them. It's basically a combination of suburban liberals and poor non-workers on public assistance.  Republicans still do well in the most rural parts of Maine and New Hampshire (as they do everywhere in rural areas), but they're not making up any ground elsewhere.

On the local level, it will be interesting to see how Maine does.  We don't have a large tax base as it is, and we're losing population.  We have several excellent colleges, but students tend to leave Maine.  With a Democrat governor and Democrats now controlling both houses of the legislature, there's an expected increase in social services.  I'm not sure how that will be sustainable without raising taxes on an already over-burdened working class.


How significant do you really think this "voting block" of poor non-workers on public assistance is in NH?  My guess is that this group does not make up much of what is turning NH blue.  First off, they're not new to NH (people don't typically move to NH for the welfare); secondly, NH unemployment rate is 2.1%; and lastly, people on the lowest rung of the eonomic ladder are not known historically for being high turnout voters.

Around 6% of the population in NH and over 7% of the population in Maine is disabled, both well in excess of the national average.  Thatís without taking into account welfare and other assistance for non-workers.

Letís say 10% of the voting population falls into that category. When elections are decided by 2% or less, you donít think thatís a powerful bloc?


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