Author Topic: Trumpís Economy (merged)  (Read 39107 times)

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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #630 on: January 05, 2019, 05:13:19 PM »

Offline kraidstar

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It is a good jobs report.  No one ever said that reckless deficit spending (in the form of a tax cut) wouldn't have a stimulating effect on the economy.  Wall Street doesn't seem to think it will last.  I don't either.  Actually the jobs number is a little hard to believe.  I guess stores hire for Christmas.  I don't know.

I wonder how many of those 312,000 jobs went to immigrants (legal or otherwise).  Where did all these workers come from all of the sudden?
all good points.  as you mentioned, I would suspect that many of those jobs were seasonal and would also suspect that many of the people filling those positions were taking them as second jobs to earn some supplemental income.  at this point, how can the economy have such a low unemployment rate yet have that many job positions being filled unless they're being filled as secondary jobs or by immigrants?

would also be curious as to the types of jobs that are being posted and filled.  are they high-paying jobs?  are they jobs that provide a sufficient income to live on while providing benefits?  are these the types of jobs that are considered career-oriented or just transient labor (i.e. a job that has no growth potential and not something that retains employees for long nor provides much of a stepping stone or resume filler for a better job)?

Part of it was that the workforce participation rate increased. In other words, people who had given up on looking for work rejoined the labor force.

Also, note that wages increased significantly. These arenít all dead-end jobs.
what would you consider 'significantly'?  to me, that'd be something 5% or above.  I believe the rate reported was 3.2% which I consider 'average'.  I've had years where I've increased my salary as much as 5% in a less booming economy without having to switch jobs. 

my question to the blog community here still stands from my other post in this thread --> is anyone here reaping any benefit from this supposed hot job market whether it be a better job, better-paying job or significant pay increase in their current job?

3.2% average wage growth isnít average.

For me, 2018 was my best year ever in private practice. My wife also saw her wages increase by a little over 6%. Between our income and lower taxes, weíve put more into savings, had more overnight trips, and spent more on remodeling the house than we have in years.

My younger brother has an auto paint correction business. Great year for him.

My older brother is a financial analyst. He switched jobs and increased his pay by over 30%. My sister-in-law works for IBM. Multiple co-workers lost their jobs, but she got a promotion and a significant raise.

Individual anecdotes are going to vary, though. Thatís why we look at nationwide numbers. Nationwide, both job creation and income growth are good.

I had an amazing year professionally. And I'm getting a massive tax cut which I don't need.

I drive around though and I see most people are getting different results. The ghettos are getting bigger and bigger. Go to Sanford Maine and tell me things are OK for most people. Stand in line at CVS and tell me there isn't a 50% chance the person next to you is falling down drunk or a junkie. These people are tired broken,  visibly unhealthy. 40-year-olds look like they are 65.

It's the same in Lewiston, Biddeford, Saco, the outer edges of Portland, Laconia NH, Rochester NH, Somersworth NH, Nashua, Manchester.

I just named a good chunk of southern NH/Maine right there. All those places are sketchy and I wouldn't want to walk around them at night if I were female.

Rent is disturbingly high too. Except to pay a grand per month for a 2-bedroom dump. Add in utilities, medical costs, and car costs, and the money dries up quickly even if someone isn't technically "dirt poor."

But yeah, things are good for maybe 20% of us. So there's that.

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #631 on: January 05, 2019, 05:27:44 PM »

Offline slamtheking

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It is a good jobs report.  No one ever said that reckless deficit spending (in the form of a tax cut) wouldn't have a stimulating effect on the economy.  Wall Street doesn't seem to think it will last.  I don't either.  Actually the jobs number is a little hard to believe.  I guess stores hire for Christmas.  I don't know.

I wonder how many of those 312,000 jobs went to immigrants (legal or otherwise).  Where did all these workers come from all of the sudden?
all good points.  as you mentioned, I would suspect that many of those jobs were seasonal and would also suspect that many of the people filling those positions were taking them as second jobs to earn some supplemental income.  at this point, how can the economy have such a low unemployment rate yet have that many job positions being filled unless they're being filled as secondary jobs or by immigrants?

would also be curious as to the types of jobs that are being posted and filled.  are they high-paying jobs?  are they jobs that provide a sufficient income to live on while providing benefits?  are these the types of jobs that are considered career-oriented or just transient labor (i.e. a job that has no growth potential and not something that retains employees for long nor provides much of a stepping stone or resume filler for a better job)?

Part of it was that the workforce participation rate increased. In other words, people who had given up on looking for work rejoined the labor force.

Also, note that wages increased significantly. These arenít all dead-end jobs.
what would you consider 'significantly'?  to me, that'd be something 5% or above.  I believe the rate reported was 3.2% which I consider 'average'.  I've had years where I've increased my salary as much as 5% in a less booming economy without having to switch jobs. 

my question to the blog community here still stands from my other post in this thread --> is anyone here reaping any benefit from this supposed hot job market whether it be a better job, better-paying job or significant pay increase in their current job?

3.2% average wage growth isnít average.

For me, 2018 was my best year ever in private practice. My wife also saw her wages increase by a little over 6%. Between our income and lower taxes, weíve put more into savings, had more overnight trips, and spent more on remodeling the house than we have in years.

My younger brother has an auto paint correction business. Great year for him.

My older brother is a financial analyst. He switched jobs and increased his pay by over 30%. My sister-in-law works for IBM. Multiple co-workers lost their jobs, but she got a promotion and a significant raise.

Individual anecdotes are going to vary, though. Thatís why we look at nationwide numbers. Nationwide, both job creation and income growth are good.

I had an amazing year professionally. And I'm getting a massive tax cut which I don't need.

I drive around though and I see most people are getting different results. The ghettos are getting bigger and bigger. Go to Sanford Maine and tell me things are OK for most people. Stand in line at CVS and tell me there isn't a 50% chance the person next to you is falling down drunk or a junkie. These people are tired broken,  visibly unhealthy. 40-year-olds look like they are 65.

It's the same in Lewiston, Biddeford, Saco, the outer edges of Portland, Laconia NH, Rochester NH, Somersworth NH, Nashua, Manchester.

I just named a good chunk of southern NH/Maine right there. All those places are sketchy and I wouldn't want to walk around them at night if I were female.

Rent is disturbingly high too. Except to pay a grand per month for a 2-bedroom dump. Add in utilities, medical costs, and car costs, and the money dries up quickly even if someone isn't technically "dirt poor."

But yeah, things are good for maybe 20% of us. So there's that.
this is the kind of info I'm hoping to get from people here.  great for you and for Roy and his family.  would have been good to hear if his friends are doing as well but the IBM story lines up with other people in the tech world I know. 

anyone else have something to share on whether they're benefitting from this job market?

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #632 on: January 05, 2019, 05:32:41 PM »

Offline slamtheking

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It is a good jobs report.  No one ever said that reckless deficit spending (in the form of a tax cut) wouldn't have a stimulating effect on the economy.  Wall Street doesn't seem to think it will last.  I don't either.  Actually the jobs number is a little hard to believe.  I guess stores hire for Christmas.  I don't know.

I wonder how many of those 312,000 jobs went to immigrants (legal or otherwise).  Where did all these workers come from all of the sudden?

How many unemployed citizens or documented immigrants were there at the time these jobs were created?  Was it more or less than the jobs created?  How many of those jobs were filled by imported foreign labor or undocumented immigrants?  How many filled by people already legally living here?

These are the numbers I'm interested in, and seem most relevant to the question of whether or not we should continue to import labor.  Employers should not be given a pass to hire labor at below market rate via imported labor, it's poor policy and harms the unemployed already living here legally.
this is an overlooked component to this job market IMHO.  My company filled a lot of it's IT positions with lower-salaried people on work visas from India and China.  this probably skews my opinion of these job reports because I see firsthand that a number of the good-paying positions filled in my division don't go to Americans but to people on work visas OR the jobs are outsourced to companies that send these jobs overseas to India where the salaries drop even further. 

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #633 on: January 05, 2019, 05:33:29 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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It is a good jobs report.  No one ever said that reckless deficit spending (in the form of a tax cut) wouldn't have a stimulating effect on the economy.  Wall Street doesn't seem to think it will last.  I don't either.  Actually the jobs number is a little hard to believe.  I guess stores hire for Christmas.  I don't know.

I wonder how many of those 312,000 jobs went to immigrants (legal or otherwise).  Where did all these workers come from all of the sudden?
all good points.  as you mentioned, I would suspect that many of those jobs were seasonal and would also suspect that many of the people filling those positions were taking them as second jobs to earn some supplemental income.  at this point, how can the economy have such a low unemployment rate yet have that many job positions being filled unless they're being filled as secondary jobs or by immigrants?

would also be curious as to the types of jobs that are being posted and filled.  are they high-paying jobs?  are they jobs that provide a sufficient income to live on while providing benefits?  are these the types of jobs that are considered career-oriented or just transient labor (i.e. a job that has no growth potential and not something that retains employees for long nor provides much of a stepping stone or resume filler for a better job)?

Part of it was that the workforce participation rate increased. In other words, people who had given up on looking for work rejoined the labor force.

Also, note that wages increased significantly. These arenít all dead-end jobs.
what would you consider 'significantly'?  to me, that'd be something 5% or above.  I believe the rate reported was 3.2% which I consider 'average'.  I've had years where I've increased my salary as much as 5% in a less booming economy without having to switch jobs. 

my question to the blog community here still stands from my other post in this thread --> is anyone here reaping any benefit from this supposed hot job market whether it be a better job, better-paying job or significant pay increase in their current job?

3.2% average wage growth isnít average.

For me, 2018 was my best year ever in private practice. My wife also saw her wages increase by a little over 6%. Between our income and lower taxes, weíve put more into savings, had more overnight trips, and spent more on remodeling the house than we have in years.

My younger brother has an auto paint correction business. Great year for him.

My older brother is a financial analyst. He switched jobs and increased his pay by over 30%. My sister-in-law works for IBM. Multiple co-workers lost their jobs, but she got a promotion and a significant raise.

Individual anecdotes are going to vary, though. Thatís why we look at nationwide numbers. Nationwide, both job creation and income growth are good.

I had an amazing year professionally. And I'm getting a massive tax cut which I don't need.

I drive around though and I see most people are getting different results. The ghettos are getting bigger and bigger. Go to Sanford Maine and tell me things are OK for most people. Stand in line at CVS and tell me there isn't a 50% chance the person next to you is falling down drunk or a junkie. These people are tired broken,  visibly unhealthy. 40-year-olds look like they are 65.

It's the same in Lewiston, Biddeford, Saco, the outer edges of Portland, Laconia NH, Rochester NH, Somersworth NH, Nashua, Manchester.

I just named a good chunk of southern NH/Maine right there. All those places are sketchy and I wouldn't want to walk around them at night if I were female.

Rent is disturbingly high too. Except to pay a grand per month for a 2-bedroom dump. Add in utilities, medical costs, and car costs, and the money dries up quickly even if someone isn't technically "dirt poor."

But yeah, things are good for maybe 20% of us. So there's that.
this is the kind of info I'm hoping to get from people here.  great for you and for Roy and his family.  would have been good to hear if his friends are doing as well but the IBM story lines up with other people in the tech world I know. 

anyone else have something to share on whether they're benefitting from this job market?
Of course there are exceptions but from the people I know and deal with it seems as though the affluent are more affluent and those that are not are doing no better than they were.  That really is not a surprise in my opinion.
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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #634 on: January 18, 2019, 05:11:08 PM »

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Bye Bye Trade War? China Plans $1 Trillion Buying Spree to Reduce US Trade Deficit

China has extended the olive branch back to the United States by offering a path to eliminate Washingtonís burgeoning trade deficit with the country, Bloomberg reported Friday. The news comes less than a day after The Wall Street Journal reported that the Trump administration was considering lifting tariffs amid the ongoing trade war.

Citing sources familiar with the matter, Bloomberg reported Friday that China has offered to significantly boost its purchase of U.S. goods over a six-year period in an effort to re-balance trade between the two superpowers. By increasing its annual imports from the United States, Beijing would reduce its trade surplus to zero by 2024. That would require a spending boost of more than $1 trillion.

Last year, Beijingís surplus with the U.S. stood at $323 billion.

Trade talks between the U.S. and China are progressing at breakneck speed, a strong sign that both sides are looking to end the tariff dispute before March. Thatís when the 90-day truce agreed to by President Donald Trump and Chinaís Xi Jinping is set to expire.


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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #635 on: January 18, 2019, 05:35:48 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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It is a good jobs report.  No one ever said that reckless deficit spending (in the form of a tax cut) wouldn't have a stimulating effect on the economy.  Wall Street doesn't seem to think it will last.  I don't either.  Actually the jobs number is a little hard to believe.  I guess stores hire for Christmas.  I don't know.

I wonder how many of those 312,000 jobs went to immigrants (legal or otherwise).  Where did all these workers come from all of the sudden?
all good points.  as you mentioned, I would suspect that many of those jobs were seasonal and would also suspect that many of the people filling those positions were taking them as second jobs to earn some supplemental income.  at this point, how can the economy have such a low unemployment rate yet have that many job positions being filled unless they're being filled as secondary jobs or by immigrants?

would also be curious as to the types of jobs that are being posted and filled.  are they high-paying jobs?  are they jobs that provide a sufficient income to live on while providing benefits?  are these the types of jobs that are considered career-oriented or just transient labor (i.e. a job that has no growth potential and not something that retains employees for long nor provides much of a stepping stone or resume filler for a better job)?

Part of it was that the workforce participation rate increased. In other words, people who had given up on looking for work rejoined the labor force.

Also, note that wages increased significantly. These arenít all dead-end jobs.
what would you consider 'significantly'?  to me, that'd be something 5% or above.  I believe the rate reported was 3.2% which I consider 'average'.  I've had years where I've increased my salary as much as 5% in a less booming economy without having to switch jobs. 

my question to the blog community here still stands from my other post in this thread --> is anyone here reaping any benefit from this supposed hot job market whether it be a better job, better-paying job or significant pay increase in their current job?

3.2% average wage growth isnít average.

For me, 2018 was my best year ever in private practice. My wife also saw her wages increase by a little over 6%. Between our income and lower taxes, weíve put more into savings, had more overnight trips, and spent more on remodeling the house than we have in years.

My younger brother has an auto paint correction business. Great year for him.

My older brother is a financial analyst. He switched jobs and increased his pay by over 30%. My sister-in-law works for IBM. Multiple co-workers lost their jobs, but she got a promotion and a significant raise.

Individual anecdotes are going to vary, though. Thatís why we look at nationwide numbers. Nationwide, both job creation and income growth are good.

I had an amazing year professionally. And I'm getting a massive tax cut which I don't need.

I drive around though and I see most people are getting different results. The ghettos are getting bigger and bigger. Go to Sanford Maine and tell me things are OK for most people. Stand in line at CVS and tell me there isn't a 50% chance the person next to you is falling down drunk or a junkie. These people are tired broken,  visibly unhealthy. 40-year-olds look like they are 65.

It's the same in Lewiston, Biddeford, Saco, the outer edges of Portland, Laconia NH, Rochester NH, Somersworth NH, Nashua, Manchester.

I just named a good chunk of southern NH/Maine right there. All those places are sketchy and I wouldn't want to walk around them at night if I were female.

Rent is disturbingly high too. Except to pay a grand per month for a 2-bedroom dump. Add in utilities, medical costs, and car costs, and the money dries up quickly even if someone isn't technically "dirt poor."

But yeah, things are good for maybe 20% of us. So there's that.
this is the kind of info I'm hoping to get from people here.  great for you and for Roy and his family.  would have been good to hear if his friends are doing as well but the IBM story lines up with other people in the tech world I know. 

anyone else have something to share on whether they're benefitting from this job market?
Of course there are exceptions but from the people I know and deal with it seems as though the affluent are more affluent and those that are not are doing no better than they were.  That really is not a surprise in my opinion.

As a self-employed consultant I am going to benefit from the tax laws. However, as someone working in education, reliant on public school budgets who often pay me through federal grants - the moneys that fund my work are drier now than 2 years ago.  I am getting a tax break but making less money. I am hoping for a wash - but overall probably doing a little worse. 

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #636 on: April 26, 2019, 09:49:50 AM »

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.



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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #637 on: April 26, 2019, 10:31:28 AM »

Online mobilija

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Thanks for the updates Roy

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #638 on: April 26, 2019, 11:00:54 AM »

Offline slamtheking

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #639 on: April 26, 2019, 11:03:47 AM »

Offline indeedproceed

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

My 401k is barely started and I was pretty mad to see it take a hit last year. It's only 2 years old! Just a wee thing!

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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #640 on: April 26, 2019, 11:04:29 AM »

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

I don't know where mine was for the 2018 calendar year, but as of March 29, over the last 12 months mine was up 8.9%.  This calendar year it's up 20.56%.


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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #641 on: April 26, 2019, 11:09:55 AM »

Online mobilija

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

I don't know where mine was for the 2018 calendar year, but as of March 29, over the last 12 months mine was up 8.9%.  This calendar year it's up 20.56%.
I think, That would indicate you had bad 2018 like everyone else Roy.

Don't have the numbers for mine in front of me but I know it performed poorly in 2018. Usually, I just close my eyes and pretend it doesn't exist since I'm not gonna touch it for a couple more decades... but those pesky quarterly reports always come out.

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #642 on: April 26, 2019, 11:33:10 AM »

Online Roy H.

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First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

I don't know where mine was for the 2018 calendar year, but as of March 29, over the last 12 months mine was up 8.9%.  This calendar year it's up 20.56%.
I think, That would indicate you had bad 2018 like everyone else Roy.

Don't have the numbers for mine in front of me but I know it performed poorly in 2018. Usually, I just close my eyes and pretend it doesn't exist since I'm not gonna touch it for a couple more decades... but those pesky quarterly reports always come out.

Yeah, 2018 overall suffered a stock market decline, I think.  It was the last quarter or so that was rough, largely due to the FED hiking interest rates.

But, as you allude to, I don't think it makes sense to expect the market to improve 10% every year.  If it did, we should all sink every excess penny we have into our portfolio, because it would be a no-lose situation.

Rather, what we hope for is growth over time.  I assume that since January 2017 we've all enjoyed growth in our retirement funds?


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Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #643 on: April 26, 2019, 11:52:46 AM »

Offline nickagneta

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If 401k's or stock investments went down last year, that would be normal, depending on the end of your calendar year and where you are invested, because stocks took a hit last year. I think the Dow Jones was down over 5% for calendar year 2018. If not for the late year surge, the market would have been even more down than that.

Re: Trumpís Economy (merged)
« Reply #644 on: April 26, 2019, 01:39:27 PM »

Offline slamtheking

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Quote
First-quarter GDP expanded by 3.2% in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the U.S. economy had grown by 2.5% in the first quarter. It was also the first time since 2013 that first-quarter GDP topped 3%.

Disposable personal income increased by 3%, while prices increased by 1.3% when excluding food and energy. Overall prices climbed by 0.8% in the first quarter.

Net exports rose by 0.5% for the quarter while imports were up 0.6%. The first quarter marked the first time in three quarters that net imports increased; they declined in the third and fourth quarters of 2018.
that's lovely and all but did anyone else see their retirement fund (401K/403B) take a hit for calendar year 2018 despite this 'greatest economy ever'?  Personally, despite this supposedly great economy, my 401K dropped 7% for the 2018 calendar year.  that's after seeing nothing but increases since the end of the Bush administration.

I don't know where mine was for the 2018 calendar year, but as of March 29, over the last 12 months mine was up 8.9%.  This calendar year it's up 20.56%.
I think, That would indicate you had bad 2018 like everyone else Roy.

Don't have the numbers for mine in front of me but I know it performed poorly in 2018. Usually, I just close my eyes and pretend it doesn't exist since I'm not gonna touch it for a couple more decades... but those pesky quarterly reports always come out.

Yeah, 2018 overall suffered a stock market decline, I think.  It was the last quarter or so that was rough, largely due to the FED hiking interest rates.

But, as you allude to, I don't think it makes sense to expect the market to improve 10% every year.  If it did, we should all sink every excess penny we have into our portfolio, because it would be a no-lose situation.

Rather, what we hope for is growth over time.  I assume that since January 2017 we've all enjoyed growth in our retirement funds?
not looking for 10% growth each year.  that just doesn't happen.  however, my point was that Trump keeps pointing to a booming economy and yet, when I ignore the rest of the crapfest swirling around him and just focus on what he wants people to look at, his economy and tax cuts have not done a thing for me, in fact, I'm worse off. 

Am I better off in my 401K than I was at Jan 2017?  not by much.  2018 wiped out most of what I gained in 2017.  I'm still looking at the long-game on retirement and know full well that the market fluctuates.  however, Trump's touting this economy as his greatest achievement so far and as far as I'm concerned, he's failing for me and others like me that I know and work with.  should the economy start declining after the 'bump' from the corporate tax cuts, I dread what my retirement fund and job market will look like.  it's not a matter of if, but when it happens

 

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