Author Topic: Historic Poli Sci Fi: Financial Socialism in Professional Sports  (Read 505 times)

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Offline ManchesterCelticsFan

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Engineered regulated control systems which maintain a goal of making the leagues competitive and therefore usually more interesting such as the Luxury Tax and Salary Cap, Draft Order / Lottery Chances, Trading Rules/Limits, Free Signing Agent Rules/Limits, etc. Now, imagine for a moment it is 1901 in MLB or 1949 in the NBA. A man, lets call him Rondald Dump, happens to own both the New York Yankees and the Minneapolis/Los Angeles Lakers, 2 of the biggest, most glamorous markets by far in each of the leagues. Ronald hijacks a political party strong enough to stave off each the leagues “financial socialism” so that there are no rules/regulations listed above or anything even remotely close to it. In fact, any rule or regulation that the league already has in place and enhances league competitiveness, Ronald and gang immediately deregulate/undo those rules/regulations. Anytime a rule is shot down by members of any of the other 29 teams or their fans, he gets his Cult Minions to “Stand Back, Stand By” and therefore none of these rules ever gain serious traction. Ronald and gang have strong motivation to do this because in their minds, they earned the money, not the market nor the league that gives them teams or in this case, Jabronis to play and beat up. They earned this money not due to the shear high population numbers and (“fake”) media advantages they get, no sir/ma’am, they earn it because they are “GREAT!”

 

In the above scenario, how many championships would the Lakers and the Yankees have by now? Assuming the leagues survive the lack of competitiveness with 2 of the biggest markets having by far the most to spend on the best players available. The Lakers and Yankees can Stack the Deck anytime they want. Ronald Dump in this scenario passes his reign of power onto his son, lets call him Derrick Dump and so on to Derrick Dump Junior, etc. So the dynasty of these teams will never end. If one assumes each would win about 90% of the championships in that time frame, that would be about 108 Championships for the Yankees and 64 championships for the Lakers and slim pickings for the other 29 teams in the leagues.

 

Fans who like the fact that each sport league emphatically denounces financial socialism but do not live in LA or NY would have motivation to move there so they could go to more games in person and watch their team kick butt or switch fan allegiances because they are sick of backing a Jabroni.… Except, these very same fans would find themselves in a catch-22. They would find themselves in today’s world were the majority of Californians and New Yorkers would not necessarily denounce financial socialism in the real world/government.  :D

Feel free to add to this historic political science fiction sports story, tweak it to your point of view, or whatever. 

Re: Historic Poli Sci Fi: Financial Socialism in Professional Sports
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2020, 06:44:51 PM »

Offline ozgod

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I will say that it's ironic that most American sports leagues in our capitalist country have a salary cap of some sort, which in a way redistributes resources by reallocating players to avoid them all congregating on the same team, while the European sports leagues in European social democracies or socialist countries do not. In La Liga Barcelona and Real Madrid can spend whatever they want on players, so the competition is basically a two horse race every year, or in Germany where Bayern Munich is basically the foregone winner each year, or in England where Manchester City, funded by Sheikh Mansour of the Emirates, can just buy whoever they want while teams like Burnley are too poor to do anything other than struggle to stay out of the relegation zone each year.

I prefer our system because it makes it more competitive and interesting - the Patriots managing to create a dynasty in a league with a hard salary cap is really remarkable. I can imagine being a supporter of a team other than Bayern in Germany or PSG in France, I'm sure it must be boring as heck knowing your team has no chance year after year and will never have a chance because it's just too poor. Those guys who cheer for those other teams are true fans. I just find it amusing.
Any odd typos are because I suck at typing on an iPhone :D

Re: Historic Poli Sci Fi: Financial Socialism in Professional Sports
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2020, 08:26:08 PM »

Offline KGs Knee

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I will say that it's ironic that most American sports leagues in our capitalist country have a salary cap of some sort, which in a way redistributes resources by reallocating players to avoid them all congregating on the same team, while the European sports leagues in European social democracies or socialist countries do not. In La Liga Barcelona and Real Madrid can spend whatever they want on players, so the competition is basically a two horse race every year, or in Germany where Bayern Munich is basically the foregone winner each year, or in England where Manchester City, funded by Sheikh Mansour of the Emirates, can just buy whoever they want while teams like Burnley are too poor to do anything other than struggle to stay out of the relegation zone each year.

I prefer our system because it makes it more competitive and interesting - the Patriots managing to create a dynasty in a league with a hard salary cap is really remarkable. I can imagine being a supporter of a team other than Bayern in Germany or PSG in France, I'm sure it must be boring as heck knowing your team has no chance year after year and will never have a chance because it's just too poor. Those guys who cheer for those other teams are true fans. I just find it amusing.

I would say you should consider the number of teams in Europe versus the number of teams in Amercia.  The number of top flight teams in European soccer isn't really different than America.  It'd be like if the Celtics played in a league with the two NY teams and the Maine Red Claws as well as teams from Providence, Hartford, Manchester, Worchester, Albany and other similar sized cities in the region. One of the Boston or NY teams would be in the champions league every year facing other big teams from similar leagues.