Author Topic: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated  (Read 85361 times)

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Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #60 on: May 27, 2020, 09:12:55 PM »

Offline arctic 3.0

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"When white Americans who live in a "stand your ground" state make self-defense claims in situations involving a black person's death, 36 percent are ruled justifiable homicides, Robert Spitzer, a professor of political science at the State University of New York, Cortland, said. When the situation is reversed and black Americans make self-defense claims in cases involving dead white people in these same states, just 3 percent see those deaths ruled justifiable homicides. That's the pattern in more than a decade of data."


https://www.yahoo.com/news/arbery-case-exemplifies-abuse-stand-163337629.html

Iíd be interested in seeing the raw data.  This analysis finds the opposite:

https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/2020/04-06-Stand-Your-Ground.pdf

This certainly interesting:

"A different 2014 study by Albert McCormick buttressed many of these findings. 40
 In examining
over 300 SYG cases in Florida, despite the claims by the NRA that Stand Your Ground was to
protect law-abiding citizens,41 the study found that over 50% of the claimants (those asserting the
defense) had criminal records, and almost one-third had criminal backgrounds involving at least
one violent offense.
Indeed, the McCormick study showed that the ďtriggering eventĒ precipitating the incident for
which SYG was claimed was not, as proponents argued, a fear of violence.42
 Instead, in 69% of
the cases, the most likely incident trigger was an argument or dispute that then escalated to threat
or violence. Defense against forcible felonies only comprised 27% of the triggering events.43
 In
other words, SYG laws have been used to protect the use of violence or deadly force for nearly
70% of confrontations that did not begin as a forcible felony or threatening act. Rather, they help
escalate a dispute into an incident with deadly consequences."

and this:

"In homicides where the shooter is black and the victim is white, those are
ruled to be justified 1.2 percent of the time. In cases where the shooter is
white and the victim is black those are ruled to be justified 11.2 percent of
the time. Ten times more likely if the shooter is white and the victim is
black, than if the shooter is black and the victim is white.81
In fact, despite the fact that a racial disparity already existed in justified
shootings, i.e., if the shooter was white and victim black it was ruled to be
justified 9.5% of the time, and the inverse was 1.1%., the disparity grows
when Stand Your Ground is enacted"
Jeez, itís almost like there is data to back up claims that the criminal justice system is skewed against black people.
 

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #61 on: May 27, 2020, 09:20:44 PM »

Online Roy H.

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"When white Americans who live in a "stand your ground" state make self-defense claims in situations involving a black person's death, 36 percent are ruled justifiable homicides, Robert Spitzer, a professor of political science at the State University of New York, Cortland, said. When the situation is reversed and black Americans make self-defense claims in cases involving dead white people in these same states, just 3 percent see those deaths ruled justifiable homicides. That's the pattern in more than a decade of data."


https://www.yahoo.com/news/arbery-case-exemplifies-abuse-stand-163337629.html

Iíd be interested in seeing the raw data.  This analysis finds the opposite:

https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/2020/04-06-Stand-Your-Ground.pdf

This certainly interesting:

"A different 2014 study by Albert McCormick buttressed many of these findings. 40
 In examining
over 300 SYG cases in Florida, despite the claims by the NRA that Stand Your Ground was to
protect law-abiding citizens,41 the study found that over 50% of the claimants (those asserting the
defense) had criminal records, and almost one-third had criminal backgrounds involving at least
one violent offense.
Indeed, the McCormick study showed that the ďtriggering eventĒ precipitating the incident for
which SYG was claimed was not, as proponents argued, a fear of violence.42
 Instead, in 69% of
the cases, the most likely incident trigger was an argument or dispute that then escalated to threat
or violence. Defense against forcible felonies only comprised 27% of the triggering events.43
 In
other words, SYG laws have been used to protect the use of violence or deadly force for nearly
70% of confrontations that did not begin as a forcible felony or threatening act. Rather, they help
escalate a dispute into an incident with deadly consequences."

and this:

"In homicides where the shooter is black and the victim is white, those are
ruled to be justified 1.2 percent of the time. In cases where the shooter is
white and the victim is black those are ruled to be justified 11.2 percent of
the time. Ten times more likely if the shooter is white and the victim is
black, than if the shooter is black and the victim is white.81
In fact, despite the fact that a racial disparity already existed in justified
shootings, i.e., if the shooter was white and victim black it was ruled to be
justified 9.5% of the time, and the inverse was 1.1%., the disparity grows
when Stand Your Ground is enacted"
Jeez, itís almost like there is data to back up claims that the criminal justice system is skewed against black people.

Of course, this conflicts wildly with the other study posted by Liam, which conflicts with the Civil Rights Commissionís findings.
Once a CrotoNat, always a CrotoNat. CelticsBlog Draft Champions, 2009 & 2012.

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #62 on: May 27, 2020, 09:20:59 PM »

Online Roy H.

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This is not the first time Chauvin has been involved in a violent incident during his 19 years in the Minneapolis Police Department. He has been involved in violent incidents before, including three police shootings. And he has been the subject of 10 different complaints filed to the city's Civilian Review Authority and the Office of Police Conduct.

The other officer in the video, Tou Thao, has a record of similar incidents. He settled an excessive-force lawsuit out of court in 2017.

Chauvin has been involved in deaths and shootings before, and has been the subject of several complaints

Chauvin and another officer, Terry Nutter, pursued three young men in a car chase in 2005, according to a 2016 report from Communities United Against Police Brutality (CUAPB).

The officers "slammed into their car," and Darwin Vivar, 28, and Klevar Jacome, 35, "were killed instantly."

The third man, 35-year-old Everett Vivar, died several days later. The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for Chauvin's full service record.

The next year, in 2006, Chauvin was among six officers to respond to a stabbing, the CUAPB reported.

Wayne Reyes, who reportedly stabbed his girlfriend and a friend, was stopped in his truck by the responding officers. According to police, Reyes pulled a shotgun out. The six police officers fired upon and killed him, according to the CUAPB report.

Two years later, just after 2 a.m. one morning in 2008, Chauvin responded to a 911 domestic assault call in the Phillips neighborhood of Minneapolis, the Pioneer Press reported.

Chauvin and his police force partner entered the home, confronting Ira Latrell Toles, whose partner had made the 911 call. Toles ran from the pair, but "they caught and tried to subdue him," a police statement said. Toles "grabbed at one of the officer's guns," and Chauvin shot him in the torso.

Earlier in 2008, the department awarded Chauvin a medal for his valor in response to an incident with an armed man, according to the Pioneer Press.

A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of his arrest.
A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of his arrest.
AP Photo/Jim Mone

In 2011, Chauvin was involved in a third police shooting.

He was among five officers to respond to reports of a shooting. Leroy Martinez, a 23-year-old Alaskan Native American, was spotted running from the scene, and the officers gave chase, local news reported.

Martinez brandished a pistol as he fled, the police said. Terry Nutter, one of the responding officers, shot Martinez.

An eyewitness account, reported by the Star Tribune, challenged the police's claim that Martinez was holding a pistol when he was shot.

"He had no reason to shoot that little boy," Delora Iceman told the Star Tribune. She said Martinez had dropped the weapon and held his arms in the air before police shot him.

During his nearly two decades with the Minneapolis Police Department, Chauvin has been the subject of several internal complaints, according to a CUAPB database.

In three separate reviews from the Civilian Review Authority, he was found to have used "demeaning tone," "derogatory language," and "language Ė other." No other details were available.

He has also been the subject of seven different reviews by the local Office of Police Conduct. Each review concludes: "Closed Ė No discipline." No other details were available.

Thao, the officer who stood guard as Chauvin knelt on George Floyd's neck, settled an excessive-use-of-force lawsuit for $25,000

Thao, who completed police academy training in 2009, was sued for excessive use of force in 2017.

Lamar Ferguson, the plaintiff, was walking with a pregnant woman in 2014 when Thao and another officer, Robert Thunder, stopped and searched the pair, according to the lawsuit.

The officers then began beating Ferguson, they alleged in legal filings.

Ferguson withstood "punches, kicks, and knees to the face and body while [he] was defenseless and handcuffed, was so extreme that it caused [him] to suffer broken teeth as well as other bruising and trauma," the complaint said.

Then the officers took Ferguson to a local hospital for treatment. When they escorted him to jail afterward, Thunder left him in "in t-shirt and underpants" despite hospital staff's recommendation that Ferguson should be allowed to put on clothing, and threw the hospital discharge papers in the trash, according to the lawsuit.

In a deposition, Thao said he arrested Ferguson because of an outstanding arrest warrant, adding that he punched Ferguson after one of his hands slipped out of the handcuffs, the Star Tribune reported.

"He tries to pull away," Thao said. "And he puts his hands on me and tries to give me a stiff arm in a way to try to get me off of him. After ó at this point, he's actively resisting arrest. He ó so I had no choice but to punch him. I punched him in the face. It causes him to pause a bit which gives Officer Thunder the time to come around and help."

The lawsuit was settled out of court for $25,000, one of Ferguson's attorneys told the Star Tribune.


I donít know how many complaints the average officer gets against them, but 10 seems like a lot.
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Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #63 on: May 27, 2020, 09:48:28 PM »

Online SparzWizard

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If you live in Los Angeles, Downtown LA going on about their BLM protest over George Floyd and shutting down the 101; on a non-pandemic/lockdown order this freeway would be brutal right now.

I see protestors smashing California Highway Patrol vehicles and windows.

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #64 on: May 27, 2020, 09:59:46 PM »

Online Roy H.

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I see protestors smashing California Highway Patrol vehicles and windows.

Those engaging in violence should all be locked up.
Once a CrotoNat, always a CrotoNat. CelticsBlog Draft Champions, 2009 & 2012.

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #65 on: May 28, 2020, 12:54:29 AM »

Offline blink

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If you live in Los Angeles, Downtown LA going on about their BLM protest over George Floyd and shutting down the 101; on a non-pandemic/lockdown order this freeway would be brutal right now.

I see protestors smashing California Highway Patrol vehicles and windows.

it was insane. 

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #66 on: May 28, 2020, 12:56:52 AM »

Offline blink

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I am all for throwing the book at every single one of the cops that had any hand in the death of George Floyd.  Even the ones that were just watching what happened.  It has happened too many times in our country, over and over again.  It is 1000% completely wrong.  I think everyone agrees with that.  I 100% agree with the right of anyone to peacefully and lawfully protest ANYTHING they want in this country.  The George Floyd thing is def worth protesting, especially in LA where there have been numerous similar cases.

But what happened today in downtown LA was wrong too.  Those protestors know it is illegal and highly dangerous to march onto the freeway, stop traffic.  So they did that, then they turned into a mob and the group attacked two different police cars.  There is a bunch of lies on twitter about the guy who got injured.  I was watching it on live TV, the cops didn't run him over, he jumped on the Police car as it was driving away and then he jumped off and lost his balance and face planted.  It wasn't the cops fault, it was the guy's fault who jumped on the car.  The 2nd cop car drove up next to the guy who got injured and then the whole mob turned even uglier, breaking out the rear window of the the 2nd car and you really wonder what would have happened to that officer if he couldn't have driven away.

Someone needs to teach these protestors that violence doesn't give you legitimacy.  Violence isn't going to get the change you want.  What is more powerful, people peacefully protesting in solidarity, or the crap that happened today in downtown LA?  It makes me so mad, because the protest needs to happen, in LA especially.  But the protesters give away their power when they give into violence and just turn into a mob.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 01:03:21 AM by blink »

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #67 on: May 28, 2020, 01:34:54 AM »

Online SparzWizard

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I am all for throwing the book at every single one of the cops that had any hand in the death of George Floyd.  Even the ones that were just watching what happened.  It has happened too many times in our country, over and over again.  It is 1000% completely wrong.  I think everyone agrees with that.  I 100% agree with the right of anyone to peacefully and lawfully protest ANYTHING they want in this country.  The George Floyd thing is def worth protesting, especially in LA where there have been numerous similar cases.

But what happened today in downtown LA was wrong too.  Those protestors know it is illegal and highly dangerous to march onto the freeway, stop traffic.  So they did that, then they turned into a mob and the group attacked two different police cars.  There is a bunch of lies on twitter about the guy who got injured.  I was watching it on live TV, the cops didn't run him over, he jumped on the Police car as it was driving away and then he jumped off and lost his balance and face planted.  It wasn't the cops fault, it was the guy's fault who jumped on the car.  The 2nd cop car drove up next to the guy who got injured and then the whole mob turned even uglier, breaking out the rear window of the the 2nd car and you really wonder what would have happened to that officer if he couldn't have driven away.

Someone needs to teach these protestors that violence doesn't give you legitimacy.  Violence isn't going to get the change you want.  What is more powerful, people peacefully protesting in solidarity, or the crap that happened today in downtown LA?  It makes me so mad, because the protest needs to happen, in LA especially.  But the protesters give away their power when they give into violence and just turn into a mob.

I wonder if this is going to become another Hong Kong thing where protestors or civilians attack/defer police officers. I don't support violent protests, but maybe in their minds, violence is being used as a means to get the entire nation's police forces' acts together because this problem has gone long enough. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown (from Ferguson), Eric Garner, Ahmaud Arbery, and now George Floyd. Just what will it take for the cops to comprehend?

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #68 on: May 28, 2020, 02:10:17 AM »

Offline blink

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I am all for throwing the book at every single one of the cops that had any hand in the death of George Floyd.  Even the ones that were just watching what happened.  It has happened too many times in our country, over and over again.  It is 1000% completely wrong.  I think everyone agrees with that.  I 100% agree with the right of anyone to peacefully and lawfully protest ANYTHING they want in this country.  The George Floyd thing is def worth protesting, especially in LA where there have been numerous similar cases.

But what happened today in downtown LA was wrong too.  Those protestors know it is illegal and highly dangerous to march onto the freeway, stop traffic.  So they did that, then they turned into a mob and the group attacked two different police cars.  There is a bunch of lies on twitter about the guy who got injured.  I was watching it on live TV, the cops didn't run him over, he jumped on the Police car as it was driving away and then he jumped off and lost his balance and face planted.  It wasn't the cops fault, it was the guy's fault who jumped on the car.  The 2nd cop car drove up next to the guy who got injured and then the whole mob turned even uglier, breaking out the rear window of the the 2nd car and you really wonder what would have happened to that officer if he couldn't have driven away.

Someone needs to teach these protestors that violence doesn't give you legitimacy.  Violence isn't going to get the change you want.  What is more powerful, people peacefully protesting in solidarity, or the crap that happened today in downtown LA?  It makes me so mad, because the protest needs to happen, in LA especially.  But the protesters give away their power when they give into violence and just turn into a mob.

I wonder if this is going to become another Hong Kong thing where protestors or civilians attack/defer police officers. I don't support violent protests, but maybe in their minds, violence is being used as a means to get the entire nation's police forces' acts together because this problem has gone long enough. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown (from Ferguson), Eric Garner, Ahmaud Arbery, and now George Floyd. Just what will it take for the cops to comprehend?

I don't have any answers for any of that.  I know that some people probably 'feel' that violence is their only choice to get noticed, or push the issue.  They aren't wrong to feel that way, but that doesn't make their behavior ok.   But they probably don't care about being right, or care about following the law, or care about endangering their own or other people's lives. 

Were the cops in the cars that were targeted decent cops, or were they criminals like the ones who killed Floyd?  The protestors don't know, and neither do we.  We all know that there needs to be some reform of police departments in our country. But how does the behavior of those people today help to do that?

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #69 on: May 28, 2020, 02:25:39 AM »

Online Roy H.

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Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown (from Ferguson), Eric Garner, Ahmaud Arbery, and now George Floyd. Just what will it take for the cops to comprehend?

Martin is a sad case, but a proper case of stand your ground.  A lot of people do not know the facts.  Martin was straddling Zimmerman,  hitting him and pounding his head into a rock.  Also, not a police issue.

Michael Brown assaulted an officer, tried to take his gone, and charged at him.  It was a justified shooting.

Garner is similar to Floyd, although less callous.  Neither man should be dead.

Arbery isnít police brutality, but his was another killing people should be outraged about.  Grabbing water at a construction site and jogging got a man killed. 

But, there a certainly other incidents of police shootings that should disgust us all.  Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott, Philando Castile, Justine Damond.

Three of these cases took place in or around Minneapolis.  Is that a coincidence, or a sign of poor training and oversight.
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Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #70 on: May 28, 2020, 06:36:53 AM »

Offline Csfan1984

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Quote
Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown (from Ferguson), Eric Garner, Ahmaud Arbery, and now George Floyd. Just what will it take for the cops to comprehend?

Martin is a sad case, but a proper case of stand your ground.  A lot of people do not know the facts.  Martin was straddling Zimmerman,  hitting him and pounding his head into a rock.  Also, not a police issue.

Michael Brown assaulted an officer, tried to take his gone, and charged at him.  It was a justified shooting.

Garner is similar to Floyd, although less callous.  Neither man should be dead.

Arbery isnít police brutality, but his was another killing people should be outraged about.  Grabbing water at a construction site and jogging got a man killed. 

But, there a certainly other incidents of police shootings that should disgust us all.  Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott, Philando Castile, Justine Damond.

Three of these cases took place in or around Minneapolis.  Is that a coincidence, or a sign of poor training and oversight.
Yeah always blame bad training and not bad people is the problem with how they get off.

Oh and side note though I agree most those cases you mentioned can we stop saying Martin was justified based on a bad law? If Martin was white and Zimmerman had died Martin would be free on the "stand your ground" law. Based on the facts he was being followed by a man with a gun and he feared for his life. "Stand your ground" law is extremely loose.

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #71 on: May 28, 2020, 06:51:18 AM »

Offline KGs Knee

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I mean, it's plainly obvious to anyone with a shred of morality what happened to George Floyd was unquestionably wrong and a major problem.  And I fully support the protesters here and do think people have every right to be irate over this.

But the rioting, looting, and general chaos that have occurred over this shouldn't really be tolerated either.  The police murdering someone is not just cause to destroy private property and steal from others.  This isn't going to solve anything and will probably have the exact opposite effect of what the protesters may have been hoping to achieve.  But we've seen situations like this play out similarly countless times before, so no one should be surprised I suppose.

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #72 on: May 28, 2020, 07:08:51 AM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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I think the question of bias among police often begins with an incorrect assumption:
Police arenít biased
Police shouldnít be biased
Some are biased and some arenít

The correct assumption is that every police officer is biased. Like all of us, they judge based on bits and pieces of information. These pieces include but arenít limited to: gender, size, age, attire, grooming, body art, accents, language, tone/ sound of voice, prior interactions with that person or people that look like that person, , ethnicity and race.    To deny that bias impacts quick decision-making - the type that often occurs in police work ó  is to deny reality.  I understand that when a man holds a knee to a personís neck as he struggles to breathe that we arenít talking about impulse anymore.  However, the ingredients that led to many of these incidents can manifest in sustained fury when one is feeling both anger and justification (and never mind the added ingredient of a ďbad dayĒ or lack of sleep or other stress).

If training doesnít begin with an assumption of racial bias rather than the assumption of ďcolor-blindednessĒ they are making a big mistake. Acknowledge it and train police for awareness of their biases, and of the impact biases have in the world of quick/ impulse-based decision-making.  Further, the element of seething or underlying rage is likely a factor that probably plays a role in some of these cases but may not be sufficiently addressed.  Some police get an emotional outlet via their work that is probably sometimes (in some circumstances) viewed as a benefit whereas it is generally a cost.   

After bias awareness and impact training, police should be trained with the idea that well-regulated mind, mood and body lead to better decisions both in immediate situations and in on-going events.  At the core of every person who is effective at de-escalation is someone who is well-regulated cognitively and emotionally themselves. Well-regulated doesnít mean passive or docile but rather to be able to use an alert brain for thinking and wise decision-making even in times of highest stress.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 07:14:16 AM by Neurotic Guy »

Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #73 on: May 28, 2020, 08:14:50 AM »

Offline gouki88

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I mean, it's plainly obvious to anyone with a shred of morality what happened to George Floyd was unquestionably wrong and a major problem.  And I fully support the protesters here and do think people have every right to be irate over this.

But the rioting, looting, and general chaos that have occurred over this shouldn't really be tolerated either.  The police murdering someone is not just cause to destroy private property and steal from others.  This isn't going to solve anything and will probably have the exact opposite effect of what the protesters may have been hoping to achieve.  But we've seen situations like this play out similarly countless times before, so no one should be surprised I suppose.
I donít think they believe theyíll get anywhere with peaceful protests. And I canít blame them. Most, if not all major social upheaval is not done remotely peacefully, and they are of the belief that this is a deeply systemic issue - and rightfully so. I donít think they give a [dang] about being civil, considering theyíre treated as a sub-class of the citizenry.
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Re: The latest homicide at the hands of police canít be tolerated
« Reply #74 on: May 28, 2020, 09:19:41 AM »

Offline bucknersrevenge

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Quote
This is not the first time Chauvin has been involved in a violent incident during his 19 years in the Minneapolis Police Department. He has been involved in violent incidents before, including three police shootings. And he has been the subject of 10 different complaints filed to the city's Civilian Review Authority and the Office of Police Conduct.

The other officer in the video, Tou Thao, has a record of similar incidents. He settled an excessive-force lawsuit out of court in 2017.

Chauvin has been involved in deaths and shootings before, and has been the subject of several complaints

Chauvin and another officer, Terry Nutter, pursued three young men in a car chase in 2005, according to a 2016 report from Communities United Against Police Brutality (CUAPB).

The officers "slammed into their car," and Darwin Vivar, 28, and Klevar Jacome, 35, "were killed instantly."

The third man, 35-year-old Everett Vivar, died several days later. The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for Chauvin's full service record.

The next year, in 2006, Chauvin was among six officers to respond to a stabbing, the CUAPB reported.

Wayne Reyes, who reportedly stabbed his girlfriend and a friend, was stopped in his truck by the responding officers. According to police, Reyes pulled a shotgun out. The six police officers fired upon and killed him, according to the CUAPB report.

Two years later, just after 2 a.m. one morning in 2008, Chauvin responded to a 911 domestic assault call in the Phillips neighborhood of Minneapolis, the Pioneer Press reported.

Chauvin and his police force partner entered the home, confronting Ira Latrell Toles, whose partner had made the 911 call. Toles ran from the pair, but "they caught and tried to subdue him," a police statement said. Toles "grabbed at one of the officer's guns," and Chauvin shot him in the torso.

Earlier in 2008, the department awarded Chauvin a medal for his valor in response to an incident with an armed man, according to the Pioneer Press.

A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of his arrest.
A chain portrait of George Floyd is part of the memorial for him, Wednesday, May 27, 2020, near the site of his arrest.
AP Photo/Jim Mone

In 2011, Chauvin was involved in a third police shooting.

He was among five officers to respond to reports of a shooting. Leroy Martinez, a 23-year-old Alaskan Native American, was spotted running from the scene, and the officers gave chase, local news reported.

Martinez brandished a pistol as he fled, the police said. Terry Nutter, one of the responding officers, shot Martinez.

An eyewitness account, reported by the Star Tribune, challenged the police's claim that Martinez was holding a pistol when he was shot.

"He had no reason to shoot that little boy," Delora Iceman told the Star Tribune. She said Martinez had dropped the weapon and held his arms in the air before police shot him.

During his nearly two decades with the Minneapolis Police Department, Chauvin has been the subject of several internal complaints, according to a CUAPB database.

In three separate reviews from the Civilian Review Authority, he was found to have used "demeaning tone," "derogatory language," and "language Ė other." No other details were available.

He has also been the subject of seven different reviews by the local Office of Police Conduct. Each review concludes: "Closed Ė No discipline." No other details were available.

Thao, the officer who stood guard as Chauvin knelt on George Floyd's neck, settled an excessive-use-of-force lawsuit for $25,000

Thao, who completed police academy training in 2009, was sued for excessive use of force in 2017.

Lamar Ferguson, the plaintiff, was walking with a pregnant woman in 2014 when Thao and another officer, Robert Thunder, stopped and searched the pair, according to the lawsuit.

The officers then began beating Ferguson, they alleged in legal filings.

Ferguson withstood "punches, kicks, and knees to the face and body while [he] was defenseless and handcuffed, was so extreme that it caused [him] to suffer broken teeth as well as other bruising and trauma," the complaint said.

Then the officers took Ferguson to a local hospital for treatment. When they escorted him to jail afterward, Thunder left him in "in t-shirt and underpants" despite hospital staff's recommendation that Ferguson should be allowed to put on clothing, and threw the hospital discharge papers in the trash, according to the lawsuit.

In a deposition, Thao said he arrested Ferguson because of an outstanding arrest warrant, adding that he punched Ferguson after one of his hands slipped out of the handcuffs, the Star Tribune reported.

"He tries to pull away," Thao said. "And he puts his hands on me and tries to give me a stiff arm in a way to try to get me off of him. After ó at this point, he's actively resisting arrest. He ó so I had no choice but to punch him. I punched him in the face. It causes him to pause a bit which gives Officer Thunder the time to come around and help."

The lawsuit was settled out of court for $25,000, one of Ferguson's attorneys told the Star Tribune.


I donít know how many complaints the average officer gets against them, but 10 seems like a lot.

The racism isn't in Chauvin's explicit acts. The racism is in that it got to 10 before people noticed it. That people will explain things like what happened with generalizations like "those people commit more violent crimes".
Never underestimate the predictability of stupidity...