Author Topic: Coronavirus Concerns  (Read 238194 times)

TheReaLPuba and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2020, 10:58:59 AM »

Offline keevsnick

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3456
  • Tommy Points: 338
It's closer to the common flu than SARS in terms of how fatal it is - it has a ~2% death rate compared to the ~10% of SARS. As for transmission of the virus, it mainly infects people when they touch something that was contaminated by an infected individual (usually by their hands or droplets that were coughed/sneezed out) and proceed to fiddle with their nose/eyes. It's certainly not something to be terrified of, just make sure not to touch your nose and eyes without washing your hands thoroughly (besides avoiding crowds and wearing a mask in public) and you'll be fine.

Honestly, knowledge of the disease is still too early to make strong statements about the death rate.  Of known cases, about 2.2% have resulted in deaths, which yes, is closer to influenza, but maybe 10-15% above.

However, that may be underselling things.  The overwhelming majority of people who have ever contracted the disease (nearly 90%) are still sick.  Some, sadly, will die.  So 2.2% seems to be the lower bound of the death rate, given our current treatment ability.  When you just look at the percentage of people who have died as a percent of closed cases (fully recovered or died), the death rate is a frightening 18%.  That’s probably an upper-bound.

Beyond that, we’re still learning how it’s transmitted and how long some people can transmit the disease before they show signs of infection.  I’m far outside my area of expertise, but I really do want to push back against the “similar to the flu” narrative.  That would seem to be the absolute best-case scenario at this point, and we don’t have enough information to be so conclusive.

Here’s a simple to read dashboard about the status of cases that regularly updates.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

I'm glad someone brought this up, death rate is a lagging indicator. All the stories you see about SAR's or MER's base their death rate off final reported cases vs deaths, whereas we are trying to hit a moving target.

Its also important to note that the more this virus spreads the higher the chance of mutation. Either one thats makes it more easily transmissible, or one that makes it deadlier. For example there is some evidence that the Ebola outbreak of 2014 was fueled by a mutation that better adapted the virus to human cells.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2020, 04:54:49 PM »

Online ozgod

  • Tiny Archibald
  • *******
  • Posts: 7144
  • Tommy Points: 457
Not too concerned, and this is from someone who actually thought I had caught it as I was in Hong Kong back in mid January and got sick with the flu on my return to Boston. Even though I had not been in Wuhan or mainland China my doctor thought it prudent for me to self-quarantine for a couple of weeks "just in case". I wasn't tested for 2019-nCov as only the CDC can authorize that test as they have the testing kits but if I had arrived in Boston a week later (towards the end of the month) and had been to mainland China I would most likely have been required to be quarantined in California. It ended up being just garden-variety Type A influenza.

The main concern that public health authorities have with 2019-nCov is not so much the mortality rate, which while unknown will probably end up higher than normal influenza which is about 0.5% but lower than SARS which is 10% or MERS which is 30%, but the fact that for countries with underdeveloped public health systems those systems could be overwhelmed with cases. 2019-nCov seems to be more infectious than SARS or MERS, as according to the CDC (though denied by Chinese virologists) it can travel through the air in aerosolized secretions, which makes it really easy to amplify through a population. SARS and MERS path of infection is through respiratory droplets (ie someone sneezing or coughing on you, which requires fairly close contact with someone carrying the pathogen).

That said, it's really just another flu. Certainly something to be mindful of especially for people with weak immune systems, just like any other flu. But it's not Ebola or anything like that. It sounds ominous being called "coronavirus" because it hasn't really been named, they stopped naming viruses after the location they originated in because of negative connotations so it can't be called the Wuhan flu, and 2019-nCov doesn't really roll off the tongue. The best advice really would be to a) wash your hands often (bring a bottle of hand sanitizer) especially after touching foreign objects; b) avoid touching your face when you haven't washed your hands. Everyone in Hong Kong airport was wearing a mask, I only really wore one on the plane as that's just an incubation tube for all kinds of illnesses, but didn't really wear one otherwise. It's more useful wearing a mask (n95) if you're sick than if you are trying to avoid getting sick.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 03:39:08 AM by ozgod »
Any odd typos are because I suck at typing on an iPhone :D

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2020, 05:19:21 PM »

Offline BringToughnessBack

  • Rajon Rondo
  • *****
  • Posts: 5004
  • Tommy Points: 575
What does everyone think that those infected passengers were allowed to be on same plane back to USA as the uninfected? It sounds like state officials in Washington decided to not listen to the CDC and keep those infected in Japan. Now Trump is claiming he was not told they did not listen to the CDC as well and is furious.

Those uninfected American’s on the plane were never told the infected would be on same plane as well. To me this is almost criminal. What if some of those people now become infected? A plastic sheet containment area is enough to stop the potential spread on a plane?

It just seems like a bad idea to not listen to the CDC. One mistake is all it takes to spread this thing like wildfire in our country.

I read that an entire ward in South Korea in a hospital became 100 percent infected with this virus and now clusters are appearing in a few different areas in various countries.  This thing is starting to sound more and more scary. Like a bad movie. I hope they get a handle on this before it becomes a pandemic. I feel horrible for anyone who has been impacted by this already.



https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/484157-trump-furious-after-officials-allowed-americans-with-coronavirus-to

https://time.com/5789199/south-korea-coronavirus-cases/

https://www.yahoo.com/news/chinese-researchers-just-confirmed-patients-235800707.html


« Last Edit: February 22, 2020, 06:21:06 PM by BringToughnessBack »

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2020, 01:53:15 PM »

Offline nickagneta

  • NCE
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 41455
  • Tommy Points: 8053
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.


Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2020, 02:27:30 PM »

Offline celticsclay

  • Ed Macauley
  • ***********
  • Posts: 11567
  • Tommy Points: 1228
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2020, 02:37:22 PM »

Offline nickagneta

  • NCE
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 41455
  • Tommy Points: 8053
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.
I thought I read that some smaller international markets were down as much as 4.5% over the last 24 hours. And this may just be the start. Hopefully, tomorrow, there is a bounce back, which usually happens after these big one day drops. Also, hopefully, we don't start getting news of more hot spots across the globe.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2020, 02:48:49 PM »

Offline celticsclay

  • Ed Macauley
  • ***********
  • Posts: 11567
  • Tommy Points: 1228
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I found this article somewhat interesting, although it seems weird it would just bomb out for a few days and then rebound in 6 months (which would be right around the election) https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/24/past-disease-outbreaks-show-investors-shoud-ignore-the-noise-of-coronavirus.html

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.
I thought I read that some smaller international markets were down as much as 4.5% over the last 24 hours. And this may just be the start. Hopefully, tomorrow, there is a bounce back, which usually happens after these big one day drops. Also, hopefully, we don't start getting news of more hot spots across the globe.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #22 on: February 25, 2020, 05:17:18 AM »

Online ozgod

  • Tiny Archibald
  • *******
  • Posts: 7144
  • Tommy Points: 457
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.

 
I think this was due to a number of factors:

1) the rising number of cases in Iran, which has much less capability to contain an outbreak (and is surrounded by countries with large populations and porous borders that are equally limited, like Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan), and whose government is known for lying and lack of transparency;

2) cases emerging in Italy, which is part of the EU and the Schengen Treaty that allows free movement of people across the EU; and in South Korea;

3) the fact that despite China's draconian measures at containment (they locked down 60 million people!), a lot of companies have issued earnings guidance indicating drops due to disrupted supply chains and reduced demand;

4) the market hates uncertainty and the impact of this virus (not necessarily as a species-killer, but more the economic impact of people missing work, countries closing borders, affecting commerce, etc) is unknown. And;

5) the market may not have priced in the impact of Covid-19 on the global economy until recently. The prediction market for it seems to be that it would be something like SARS, which was fairly quickly contained, as opposed to something like swine flu, which was contracted by about 700m-1b people globally.

If you look at the raw number of deaths, I really feel like the panic is out of proportion, particularly if you compare it to other disasters or epidemics. Just as a comparison the WSJ looked at the impact of the Sichuan earthquake in May 2008, which killed 69k people in China, vs Covid-19 which has killed 2,618. The Sichuan earthquake didn't have any major effect on Chinese economic growth. The article went on to say that one of the main market fears is that draconian measures such as have been employed by most governments (closing borders, shutting down towns/cities, preventing the free movement of human labor) which is basically unprecedented in the history of epidemics (e.g. they didn't do that for swine flu, bird flu, SARS or MERS) will have a definite impact on global economic activity which is out of proportion to the actual human impact.

Certainly not trying to downplay it as information is very limited, but the limited data available suggests that the people at risk with Covid-19 would mainly be the same people at risk each flu season - people with weak or compromised immune systems, people with underlying medical conditions, as well as the very young and the very old. We should all take reasonable precautions (wash hands, avoid contact with people where possible, don't touch your face and eyes without washing your hands). Moreso those people at greater risk of respiratory illnesses like pneumonia. Carry a bottle of hand sanitizer and use it often. But I don't think we're at the point where we should look at others with suspicion just because they sneezed or looked Chinese  :angel:

That said, it's worth exploring the worst case scenario from an economic standpoint. The worst-case scenario economically would be something similar to the swine flu 10 years ago, which affected a billion people with a mortality rate of 0.02%. IF Covid-19 maintains its current mortality rate of 1-2%, 10 to 20 million people could die globally, most of them in third world countries with inadequate public health systems. Not quite a human slate-wiper, but it would certainly trigger a global recession.

Just my 2c...at least global stocks and US futures stabilized today. Might be some buying opportunities today.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2020, 05:49:56 AM by ozgod »
Any odd typos are because I suck at typing on an iPhone :D

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #23 on: February 25, 2020, 09:43:26 AM »

Offline BringToughnessBack

  • Rajon Rondo
  • *****
  • Posts: 5004
  • Tommy Points: 575
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.

I am definitely concerned on the economic level as well.

Has anyone already shifted money out of stocks to bonds or cash? My adviser told me to sit on sidelines for a few months and jump back in after the news settles in. They think it will lead to a more severe correction in the next couple of months with some amazing buying opportunities to follow. I did pull out of a few companies that I think are too risky to stay in for the short term but did not liquidate everything. Some companies I think could flourish in a bad downturn. I shifted my 401K around a bit as I was 100% stocks for the past few years.

I do not think the bounce in the market will survive the day as well. Short term the market will go lower. I will probably wait for next earnings reports before jumping back in. Timing the market with things like this is never easy or recommended as you could miss the bounce but there are just too many companies and industries that could get hit hard if this things blows up the world economy(Amazon, Travel/Cruise companies, Ride Share companies, Restaurants, Stocks, Consumer Grocery Stores, Entertainment Companies that rely on people going to events, etc...).

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/25/us-coronavirus-outbreak-increasingly-likely-and-could-drag-markets-jefferies-says.html

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #24 on: February 25, 2020, 12:16:20 PM »

Offline Sophomore

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3110
  • Tommy Points: 449
Rush Limbaugh says it's just the common cold and this is all lies to defeat Trump, so no worries.

https://thehill.com/homenews/media/484506-limbaugh-claims-coronavirus-is-being-weaponized-to-bring-down-trump


Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2020, 12:19:57 PM »

Offline Sophomore

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3110
  • Tommy Points: 449
After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

After the Dow dropped 300 on Friday, it's now down another 1000 based on coronavirus concerns. Hot spots have broken out in Iran, South Korea and Italy. Italy is concerning because they have no clue who patient zero is, hampering being able to make containment, both in Italy and maybe across Europe. The economic impacts of a pandemic could possibly cause a worldwide economic downturn, recession or depression.

I am certainly getting alarmed about the economic impact of this. It is hard to say exactly what caused the 3% drop today, but that is certainly significant.

 
I think this was due to a number of factors:

1) the rising number of cases in Iran, which has much less capability to contain an outbreak (and is surrounded by countries with large populations and porous borders that are equally limited, like Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan), and whose government is known for lying and lack of transparency;

2) cases emerging in Italy, which is part of the EU and the Schengen Treaty that allows free movement of people across the EU; and in South Korea;

3) the fact that despite China's draconian measures at containment (they locked down 60 million people!), a lot of companies have issued earnings guidance indicating drops due to disrupted supply chains and reduced demand;

4) the market hates uncertainty and the impact of this virus (not necessarily as a species-killer, but more the economic impact of people missing work, countries closing borders, affecting commerce, etc) is unknown. And;

5) the market may not have priced in the impact of Covid-19 on the global economy until recently. The prediction market for it seems to be that it would be something like SARS, which was fairly quickly contained, as opposed to something like swine flu, which was contracted by about 700m-1b people globally.

If you look at the raw number of deaths, I really feel like the panic is out of proportion, particularly if you compare it to other disasters or epidemics. Just as a comparison the WSJ looked at the impact of the Sichuan earthquake in May 2008, which killed 69k people in China, vs Covid-19 which has killed 2,618. The Sichuan earthquake didn't have any major effect on Chinese economic growth. The article went on to say that one of the main market fears is that draconian measures such as have been employed by most governments (closing borders, shutting down towns/cities, preventing the free movement of human labor) which is basically unprecedented in the history of epidemics (e.g. they didn't do that for swine flu, bird flu, SARS or MERS) will have a definite impact on global economic activity which is out of proportion to the actual human impact.

Certainly not trying to downplay it as information is very limited, but the limited data available suggests that the people at risk with Covid-19 would mainly be the same people at risk each flu season - people with weak or compromised immune systems, people with underlying medical conditions, as well as the very young and the very old. We should all take reasonable precautions (wash hands, avoid contact with people where possible, don't touch your face and eyes without washing your hands). Moreso those people at greater risk of respiratory illnesses like pneumonia. Carry a bottle of hand sanitizer and use it often. But I don't think we're at the point where we should look at others with suspicion just because they sneezed or looked Chinese  :angel:

That said, it's worth exploring the worst case scenario from an economic standpoint. The worst-case scenario economically would be something similar to the swine flu 10 years ago, which affected a billion people with a mortality rate of 0.02%. IF Covid-19 maintains its current mortality rate of 1-2%, 10 to 20 million people could die globally, most of them in third world countries with inadequate public health systems. Not quite a human slate-wiper, but it would certainly trigger a global recession.

Just my 2c...at least global stocks and US futures stabilized today. Might be some buying opportunities today.

You're right that it's possible to overstate things; it's pretty clear this isn't ebola with a higher transmission rate. And in general, nobody is really sure about the rate of transmission or the mortality rate. The data are extremely messy.

That said, a reasonable, plausible situation is a mortality rate about a percent higher than ordinary flu and a transmission rate 2-3 times as high. While that shouldn't cause terror in most healthy individuals who are infected, if the spread is not contained it could cause millions of deaths.  And of course (as you recognize) it could be a bad time to be a person with a weakened or compromised immune system.

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2020, 12:40:19 PM »

Offline keevsnick

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3456
  • Tommy Points: 338
I mean the real danger seems to be to older people, those over 60 account for a significant majority of deaths. In that sense its pretty typical of the flu. Still with widespread transmission and a 2-3% fatality rate a pandemic would still result in potentially a million or more deaths. In some ways the real scary part would be the damage thats going to do to the global economy, 2-3% doesn't sound like a lot but I dont think people are going to risk their life going to work if they see reports of hospitals running out of medical supplies and thousands dying form a "new=scary" virus. Given that there have already been some slightly worrisome signs of economic slowdown (and we're overdue for a recession) it could trigger a larger

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2020, 01:05:07 PM »

Offline nickagneta

  • NCE
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 41455
  • Tommy Points: 8053
The virus is definitely putting a scare into Wall Street. Historically, large falls in the markets one day are followed the next day with an increase that gets a bunch of the previous losses back.

Last Thursday the Dow Jones was down 115. Then on Friday down 227. Monday 1030.

Today instead of a usual historic bounce back, the Dow is down another 470 as I write this.


Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2020, 01:35:46 PM »

Offline heyvik

  • Don Chaney
  • *
  • Posts: 1621
  • Tommy Points: 64
per WCVB:

Coronavirus 'WILL' spread in the US, CDC says
Quote
U.S. health officials are issuing an elevated warning about the spread of coronavirus, according to The Washington Post.
“Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in the United States," said Nancy Messonier, a top official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, during briefings with lawmakers and reporters Tuesday.

Advertisement
“It’s not a question of if this will happen, but when this will happen and how many people in this country will have severe illnesses.”
Officials scrambled to halt the spread of a burgeoning virus Tuesday, from northern Italy where troops were dispatched to enforce quarantines and schools were shuttered, to South Korea, where some neighborhoods in a city of 2.5 million were brought to a near standstill.
New clusters of the illness popped up far from its apparent point of origin in China, fueling apprehension in world financial markets and political institutions. The spread fueled an increased sense of urgency among officials in some of the wealthiest nations in Europe and Asia, as well as in countries like Iran, with far fewer resources to stem the disease. But many remained uncertain about how best to contain it.
At a press conference during his visit to India on Tuesday, President Trump made a number of claims about the virus, which has sickened 80,000 and killed 2,700.
"I think that's a problem that's going to go away," Trump said of the virus, which has expanded this week in Italy, Austria, Croatia and Iran. In Iran, a day after the health minster appeared publicly to make clear that all was well, it was announced he had coronavirus.
In that news conference, Trump alleged that "we're very close to a vaccine."
However, there is no available evidence that a vaccine is "close," in fact, most infectious disease experts say developing a vaccine for the virus is roughly a year away.
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tennessee), who chairs the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, told CNN's Manu Raju Tuesday morning that "the vaccine for the coronavirus is moving more rapidly than any vaccine we have already tried to approve -- but it will take a year or 18 months. The way to stop (an outbreak) is quarantine and monitoring."
Trump also claimed in the news conference that all the U.S. coronavirus patients "are getting better ... they're all getting better."
Early Tuesday morning, Trump tweeted: "The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries. CDC & World Health have been working hard and very smart. Stock Market starting to look very good to me!"

Re: Coronavirus: Concerned?
« Reply #29 on: February 25, 2020, 01:49:25 PM »

Offline Donoghus

  • Global Moderator
  • Bob Cousy
  • **************************
  • Posts: 26389
  • Tommy Points: 1254
  • What a Pub Should Be
per WCVB:

Coronavirus 'WILL' spread in the US, CDC says
Quote
U.S. health officials are issuing an elevated warning about the spread of coronavirus, according to The Washington Post.
“Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in the United States," said Nancy Messonier, a top official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, during briefings with lawmakers and reporters Tuesday.

Advertisement
“It’s not a question of if this will happen, but when this will happen and how many people in this country will have severe illnesses.”
Officials scrambled to halt the spread of a burgeoning virus Tuesday, from northern Italy where troops were dispatched to enforce quarantines and schools were shuttered, to South Korea, where some neighborhoods in a city of 2.5 million were brought to a near standstill.
New clusters of the illness popped up far from its apparent point of origin in China, fueling apprehension in world financial markets and political institutions. The spread fueled an increased sense of urgency among officials in some of the wealthiest nations in Europe and Asia, as well as in countries like Iran, with far fewer resources to stem the disease. But many remained uncertain about how best to contain it.
At a press conference during his visit to India on Tuesday, President Trump made a number of claims about the virus, which has sickened 80,000 and killed 2,700.
"I think that's a problem that's going to go away," Trump said of the virus, which has expanded this week in Italy, Austria, Croatia and Iran. In Iran, a day after the health minster appeared publicly to make clear that all was well, it was announced he had coronavirus.
In that news conference, Trump alleged that "we're very close to a vaccine."
However, there is no available evidence that a vaccine is "close," in fact, most infectious disease experts say developing a vaccine for the virus is roughly a year away.
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tennessee), who chairs the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, told CNN's Manu Raju Tuesday morning that "the vaccine for the coronavirus is moving more rapidly than any vaccine we have already tried to approve -- but it will take a year or 18 months. The way to stop (an outbreak) is quarantine and monitoring."
Trump also claimed in the news conference that all the U.S. coronavirus patients "are getting better ... they're all getting better."
Early Tuesday morning, Trump tweeted: "The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries. CDC & World Health have been working hard and very smart. Stock Market starting to look very good to me!"



He really nailed that.


2010 CB Historical Draft - Best Overall Team