Author Topic: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars  (Read 20333 times)

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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #75 on: March 28, 2022, 04:36:42 PM »

Offline bdm860

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Eh, you've told stories about your ex-wife who is Puerto Rican (I think) and somebody (maybe at a furniture store?) not knowing she was made a negative comment about Puerto Ricans in front of both of you.  I'm pretty sure that didn't end with you slapping the guy.

Now you might have definitely thought about it, but there's a big difference between thinking and doing it.

I have a hard time imagining any scenario where I'm hitting a guy even over the most offensive of comments to my wife whom I deeply love.  And I think most men are NOT doing that, no matter how much they love their wife.

But I'm also the guy who just thought Mr. Clean wouldn't be offensive (though definitely not appropriate for a 10 year old), or didn't think calling Patty Mills a Jamaican bobsledder was offensive.  What do I know.
It was a waitress at a restaurant that was, tops, 22 years old making a racist statement. Slapping was not an option. But getting her fired was and I did do that.

This is the story I was talking about:

https://forum.celticsstrong.com/index.php?topic=50044.msg1063467#msg1063467

After 18 months with their Bigs, the Littles were: 46% less likely to use illegal drugs, 27% less likely to use alcohol, 52% less likely to skip school, 37% less likely to skip a class

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #76 on: March 28, 2022, 04:40:16 PM »

Offline gift

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Eh, you've told stories about your ex-wife who is Puerto Rican (I think) and somebody (maybe at a furniture store?) not knowing she was made a negative comment about Puerto Ricans in front of both of you.  I'm pretty sure that didn't end with you slapping the guy.

Now you might have definitely thought about it, but there's a big difference between thinking and doing it.

I have a hard time imagining any scenario where I'm hitting a guy even over the most offensive of comments to my wife whom I deeply love.  And I think most men are NOT doing that, no matter how much they love their wife.

But I'm also the guy who just thought Mr. Clean wouldn't be offensive (though definitely not appropriate for a 10 year old), or didn't think calling Patty Mills a Jamaican bobsledder was offensive.  What do I know.
It was a waitress at a restaurant that was, tops, 22 years old making a racist statement. Slapping was not an option. But getting her fired was and I did do that.

This is the story I was talking about:

https://forum.celticsstrong.com/index.php?topic=50044.msg1063467#msg1063467

Eleven years ago? Freakish memory

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #77 on: March 28, 2022, 04:52:43 PM »

Offline bdm860

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Eh, you've told stories about your ex-wife who is Puerto Rican (I think) and somebody (maybe at a furniture store?) not knowing she was made a negative comment about Puerto Ricans in front of both of you.  I'm pretty sure that didn't end with you slapping the guy.

Now you might have definitely thought about it, but there's a big difference between thinking and doing it.

I have a hard time imagining any scenario where I'm hitting a guy even over the most offensive of comments to my wife whom I deeply love.  And I think most men are NOT doing that, no matter how much they love their wife.

But I'm also the guy who just thought Mr. Clean wouldn't be offensive (though definitely not appropriate for a 10 year old), or didn't think calling Patty Mills a Jamaican bobsledder was offensive.  What do I know.
It was a waitress at a restaurant that was, tops, 22 years old making a racist statement. Slapping was not an option. But getting her fired was and I did do that.

This is the story I was talking about:

https://forum.celticsstrong.com/index.php?topic=50044.msg1063467#msg1063467

Eleven years ago? Freakish memory

Going with my sense of humor, I thought it was hilarious (not the guys comments to Nick's wife, but the foot-in-mouth part).  Memory is only good for pointless anecdotes which hold no economic value though.  Will now also probably remember the story about Nick's son for the rest of my life too.

After 18 months with their Bigs, the Littles were: 46% less likely to use illegal drugs, 27% less likely to use alcohol, 52% less likely to skip school, 37% less likely to skip a class

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #78 on: March 28, 2022, 04:58:45 PM »

Offline Donoghus

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Baldness has many causes. Happens in men and women of all ages. When it happens to an "A-List" female celebrity it's a "disease". Lol

  It is a disease. I have an acquaintance that works somewhere I stopped in times in the past. Beautiful young woman ( Iím much older) but completely bald. Got to talking snd she was cautiously optimistic about a new person she met . She hav nothing but good and very hopeful things about this love interest but she said even in this encounter and every one sheís ever had sheís had to answer whether she'd had cancer or not.
  Obviously she didnít think there was anything wrong with people with cancer ( duh I know) but she has to explain herself or has to even deal with it.  I really understand having deep hurt feelings about it. I DID think it was a nasty thing to say. This is something that HAPPENED to someone. Itís just a weird thing to say to a crowd about someone to me.

How tragic! It's just too much suffering for one person to endure in a lifetime. Bahahaha

Here's how I can prove it's not a disease. If given the choice between having alopecia or being a ginger, 100% of guys on here choose alopecia.

This is one of the dumbest effin' things I've read on this blog.


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Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #79 on: March 28, 2022, 04:58:49 PM »

Offline johnnygreen

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Baldness has many causes. Happens in men and women of all ages. When it happens to an "A-List" female celebrity it's a "disease". Lol

  It is a disease. I have an acquaintance that works somewhere I stopped in times in the past. Beautiful young woman ( Iím much older) but completely bald. Got to talking snd she was cautiously optimistic about a new person she met . She hav nothing but good and very hopeful things about this love interest but she said even in this encounter and every one sheís ever had sheís had to answer whether she'd had cancer or not.
  Obviously she didnít think there was anything wrong with people with cancer ( duh I know) but she has to explain herself or has to even deal with it.  I really understand having deep hurt feelings about it. I DID think it was a nasty thing to say. This is something that HAPPENED to someone. Itís just a weird thing to say to a crowd about someone to me.

How tragic! It's just too much suffering for one person to endure in a lifetime. Bahahaha

Here's how I can prove it's not a disease. If given the choice between having alopecia or being a ginger, 100% of guys on here choose alopecia.

Wait a minute. Is this Scal?

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #80 on: March 28, 2022, 05:07:09 PM »

Offline nickagneta

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

Eh, you've told stories about your ex-wife who is Puerto Rican (I think) and somebody (maybe at a furniture store?) not knowing she was made a negative comment about Puerto Ricans in front of both of you.  I'm pretty sure that didn't end with you slapping the guy.

Now you might have definitely thought about it, but there's a big difference between thinking and doing it.

I have a hard time imagining any scenario where I'm hitting a guy even over the most offensive of comments to my wife whom I deeply love.  And I think most men are NOT doing that, no matter how much they love their wife.

But I'm also the guy who just thought Mr. Clean wouldn't be offensive (though definitely not appropriate for a 10 year old), or didn't think calling Patty Mills a Jamaican bobsledder was offensive.  What do I know.
It was a waitress at a restaurant that was, tops, 22 years old making a racist statement. Slapping was not an option. But getting her fired was and I did do that.

This is the story I was talking about:

https://forum.celticsstrong.com/index.php?topic=50044.msg1063467#msg1063467
Another story I told here. Do see that there was a reason for handling it in a more docile way.

Also, those are three stories spanning 20 something years. The younger me got physical. The later me didn't but was still vindictive. In between, I learned a lesson about how to handle things better.

Thanks for the memories. 👍😁

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #81 on: March 28, 2022, 06:05:44 PM »

Offline kraidstar

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I think this thread needs a poll.
Are you pro-slap?
Are you anti-slap?

I vote pro

My gf: "i think there needs to be a slapping booth"

https://youtu.be/qPr-xsQvhgw

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #82 on: March 28, 2022, 06:22:58 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

It isn't ever up to anyone to determine what is/isn't or should/shouldn't be offensive to another human being. Not everyone with alopecia responds the same way and even though Jada remains poised despite having a patch of no hair doesn't mean she isn't sensitive to it and entitled to feel offended.   

My daughter had alopecia (in her 20's) and handled it extremely lightly and likely would have laughed genuinely if made fun of.  Doesn't make it right, but we all respond differently.   Your 10 year old son being bullied and picked on, especially by an adult -- I understand being incensed and coming to his defense.  In no way do I understand modeling violence as a reasonable first response.  I get the fury, I get thoughts of violence, but I don't get the acts if violence when there are other options.

And now with regard to a grown woman who is perfectly capable of protecting and defending herself.  Will Smith sees himself as her defender and is unable to control his impulse.  It doesn't occur to him that this was a joke directed at Jada and that she doesn't require her "man" to protect her.   Smith's utterly grandiose speech minutes later reveals a man who seems to think he has a special mission on Earth as a vesicle of love and as a messenger.  And clearly he is of the self-serving delusion that his violence is evidence of love rather than evidence of incompetence as a mature human being.  Will Smith is a model (in whatever behavior he chooses to model) for all children, especially those who learn how to behave from "grown men" outside their family because they don't have that model within their family.  He displayed for all to see that "grown men" handle their anger with aggression and violence followed of course by tears, rationalizations, self-aggrandizing struggles (his personal martyrdom), and eventually if needed, contrition.  It isn't evidence of being a "man", quite the contrary.   

And to those who may think, "well, Chris Rock won't be putting down Jada again" (justifying the violence)... the reality is that he increased the likelihood that edgy comics like Rock and thousands of others will now, in all likelihood, make Will/Jada jokes for months/years to come.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2022, 06:29:36 PM by Neurotic Guy »

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #83 on: March 28, 2022, 06:37:34 PM »

Offline sgrogan

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

It isn't ever up to anyone to determine what is/isn't or should/shouldn't be offensive to another human being. Not everyone with alopecia responds the same way and even though Jada remains poised despite having a patch of no hair doesn't mean she isn't sensitive to it and entitled to feel offended.   

My daughter had alopecia (in her 20's) and handled it extremely lightly and likely would have laughed genuinely if made fun of.  Doesn't make it right, but we all respond differently.   Your 10 year old son being bullied and picked on, especially by an adult -- I understand being incensed and coming to his defense.  In no way do I understand modeling violence as a reasonable first response.  I get the fury, I get thoughts of violence, but I don't get the acts if violence when there are other options.

And now with regard to a grown woman who is perfectly capable of protecting and defending herself.  Will Smith sees himself as her defender and is unable to control his impulse.  It doesn't occur to him that this was a joke directed at Jada and that she doesn't require her "man" to protect her.   Smith's utterly grandiose speech minutes later reveals a man who seems to think he has a special mission on Earth as a vesicle of love and as a messenger.  And clearly he is of the self-serving delusion that his violence is evidence of love rather than evidence of incompetence as a mature human being.  Will Smith is a model (in whatever behavior he chooses to model) for all children, especially those who learn how to behave from "grown men" outside their family because they don't have that model within their family.  He displayed for all to see that "grown men" handle their anger with aggression and violence followed of course by tears, rationalizations, self-aggrandizing struggles (his personal martyrdom), and eventually if needed, contrition.  It isn't evidence of being a "man", quite the contrary.   

And to those who may think, "well, Chris Rock won't be putting down Jada again" (justifying the violence)... the reality is that he increased the likelihood that edgy comics like Rock and thousands of others will now, in all likelihood, make Will/Jada jokes for months/years to come.
TP, third paragraph nails it.

I disagree with your summary. Comedy is a coping mechanism, and I don't think it can all be self deprecating or avoid the controversy all together. Some of this best pokes at our hidden emotions. Using the scars as a "publicity stunt" isn't what I'm looking for, but maybe "ripping of the band-aid is"

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #84 on: March 28, 2022, 07:02:27 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

It isn't ever up to anyone to determine what is/isn't or should/shouldn't be offensive to another human being. Not everyone with alopecia responds the same way and even though Jada remains poised despite having a patch of no hair doesn't mean she isn't sensitive to it and entitled to feel offended.   

My daughter had alopecia (in her 20's) and handled it extremely lightly and likely would have laughed genuinely if made fun of.  Doesn't make it right, but we all respond differently.   Your 10 year old son being bullied and picked on, especially by an adult -- I understand being incensed and coming to his defense.  In no way do I understand modeling violence as a reasonable first response.  I get the fury, I get thoughts of violence, but I don't get the acts if violence when there are other options.

And now with regard to a grown woman who is perfectly capable of protecting and defending herself.  Will Smith sees himself as her defender and is unable to control his impulse.  It doesn't occur to him that this was a joke directed at Jada and that she doesn't require her "man" to protect her.   Smith's utterly grandiose speech minutes later reveals a man who seems to think he has a special mission on Earth as a vesicle of love and as a messenger.  And clearly he is of the self-serving delusion that his violence is evidence of love rather than evidence of incompetence as a mature human being.  Will Smith is a model (in whatever behavior he chooses to model) for all children, especially those who learn how to behave from "grown men" outside their family because they don't have that model within their family.  He displayed for all to see that "grown men" handle their anger with aggression and violence followed of course by tears, rationalizations, self-aggrandizing struggles (his personal martyrdom), and eventually if needed, contrition.  It isn't evidence of being a "man", quite the contrary.   

And to those who may think, "well, Chris Rock won't be putting down Jada again" (justifying the violence)... the reality is that he increased the likelihood that edgy comics like Rock and thousands of others will now, in all likelihood, make Will/Jada jokes for months/years to come.
TP, third paragraph nails it.

I disagree with your summary. Comedy is a coping mechanism, and I don't think it can all be self deprecating or avoid the controversy all together. Some of this best pokes at our hidden emotions. Using the scars as a "publicity stunt" isn't what I'm looking for, but maybe "ripping of the band-aid is"

Not sure I understand your interpretation of my last paragraph but I wasn't making a judgment about the use of potentially offensive humor at all.  I think that's often what makes comedians funny.  I was just suggesting that Smith's actions won't serve the purpose of getting people to not make fun of Jada, rather, he likely increased that likelihood.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #85 on: March 28, 2022, 07:14:37 PM »

Offline sgrogan

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My son had alopecia areata when he was 10. He was made fun of and bullied in school over it. One day, at his soccer game a parent called him baldy from the sidelines and I heard it.

Can't say I reacted much differently than Will Smith. Being a coach, it was a bad look. But every player on my team thanked me and a slew of parents gave me "Well done" pats on the back.

Alopecia is a tough disease to handle for those that should have full heads of hair, kids and women, especially. Whoever allowed that joke to be included should be fired. If Rock improvised it, don't bring him back.

As for Will, as with me, not a good look, but I completely understand his passion, rage and what he did and why.

I'm personally in the camp of I don't find the joke (GI Jane, not baldy) offensive.  Because being called GI Jane is not really an insult (to me).

So let me ask you this, if that guy at the soccer game said something like, "who's guarding Mr. Clean?" would you be as upset?  To me, that's more like what the GI Jane joke is, more "lighthearted" not really derogatory.

And I'm someone who went through chemo at 16-17,went  completely hairless, and had a lot of bald jokes made about me (mostly Powder), not all were funny, but none were insulting, because let's face it, I was bald.  But I'm also a guy with thick skin, not a younger kid or a woman, who I can understand might not have the same outlook as me.
That joke would not have changed my reaction. That, to a ten year old that's already being bullied over his condition, is no different than just calling him baldy. Maybe worse because you are making that child the butt of the joke.

Kids should always be off-limits.  Whether it's mean-spirited or "joking", that stuff can cut deep.

In the case of Pinkett-Smith, getting gently roasted is part of choosing to be in the public eye.  I might feel differently if she was a non-celebrity, but she has chosen this life and through some of her statements and actions has made herself somebody who can should expect some silly barbs.

There has been some more barbed jokes about the open marriage and Pinkett-Smith's boyfriends during award season, and I'm wondering if that underlies some of this.  But, maybe not; I'm sure the Smiths aren't the only couple to have an "arrangement"; it's probably most notable because it's the woman, rather than just the man, who "benefits".
Will Smith is still a husband. And I challenge any man who loves his wife deeply to tell me they might not do something similar, or at least seriously consider it, if someone made a joke about your wife's condition she is sensitive about.

I said what Smith did was not right but I understand the passion and emotions that drove him to do it. I think most people would if put in a similar position. Whether they be public individuals or not. In the end you're still a husband, wife, mom or dad and shutting down those protective emotions aren't easy.

It isn't ever up to anyone to determine what is/isn't or should/shouldn't be offensive to another human being. Not everyone with alopecia responds the same way and even though Jada remains poised despite having a patch of no hair doesn't mean she isn't sensitive to it and entitled to feel offended.   

My daughter had alopecia (in her 20's) and handled it extremely lightly and likely would have laughed genuinely if made fun of.  Doesn't make it right, but we all respond differently.   Your 10 year old son being bullied and picked on, especially by an adult -- I understand being incensed and coming to his defense.  In no way do I understand modeling violence as a reasonable first response.  I get the fury, I get thoughts of violence, but I don't get the acts if violence when there are other options.

And now with regard to a grown woman who is perfectly capable of protecting and defending herself.  Will Smith sees himself as her defender and is unable to control his impulse.  It doesn't occur to him that this was a joke directed at Jada and that she doesn't require her "man" to protect her.   Smith's utterly grandiose speech minutes later reveals a man who seems to think he has a special mission on Earth as a vesicle of love and as a messenger.  And clearly he is of the self-serving delusion that his violence is evidence of love rather than evidence of incompetence as a mature human being.  Will Smith is a model (in whatever behavior he chooses to model) for all children, especially those who learn how to behave from "grown men" outside their family because they don't have that model within their family.  He displayed for all to see that "grown men" handle their anger with aggression and violence followed of course by tears, rationalizations, self-aggrandizing struggles (his personal martyrdom), and eventually if needed, contrition.  It isn't evidence of being a "man", quite the contrary.   

And to those who may think, "well, Chris Rock won't be putting down Jada again" (justifying the violence)... the reality is that he increased the likelihood that edgy comics like Rock and thousands of others will now, in all likelihood, make Will/Jada jokes for months/years to come.
TP, third paragraph nails it.

I disagree with your summary. Comedy is a coping mechanism, and I don't think it can all be self deprecating or avoid the controversy all together. Some of this best pokes at our hidden emotions. Using the scars as a "publicity stunt" isn't what I'm looking for, but maybe "ripping of the band-aid is"

Not sure I understand your interpretation of my last paragraph but I wasn't making a judgment about the use of potentially offensive humor at all.  I think that's often what makes comedians funny.  I was just suggesting that Smith's actions won't serve the purpose of getting people to not make fun of Jada, rather, he likely increased that likelihood.

Some will use the opportunity to be edgy, some will just pile on the situation. I don't think Chris Rock gets cancelled.

I did misinterpret your views on "potentially offensive humor", sorry for that.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #86 on: March 28, 2022, 08:10:12 PM »

Offline mqtcelticsfan

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Seems a bit odd to me how much time is being spent actively defending either party. I think Smith was certainly the most wrong here, but I also think Chris Rock/the producers should have tabled this joke about a medical condition. That said, mean words arenít an excuse for physical violence. I donít understand why people supporting Smithís actions arenít distinguishing between standing up for his wife and his unacceptable response.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #87 on: March 28, 2022, 08:47:19 PM »

Offline liam

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I'm glad Chris Rock apologized.

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #88 on: March 28, 2022, 10:29:45 PM »

Offline BruceBanner18

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I'm glad Chris Rock apologized.

Did you dream this?

Re: Will Smith smacks Chris Rock at Oscars
« Reply #89 on: March 28, 2022, 10:31:41 PM »

Offline BruceBanner18

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This was obviously stage by Jake Paul to hype an undercard bout at his next fight.

I hate to say I told you so...or do I?!?!


https://www.ladbible.com/entertainment/jake-paul-offers-will-smith-and-chris-rock-30-million-to-fight-20220328.amp.html